Monthly Archives: April 2021

How to start a successful role even before you get the job

Here’s a fact you have probably already heard of: the first 90 days in a new job are crucial to your success in the role. And it’s not about passing your probation! It’s about building the credibility, reputation, and personal brand that will carry you over the next few years and impact your short-term career progress with your new employer.

During the first 90 days, the employer will evaluate if you are in fact a good fit for the company. But more than this, it can set the tone for the rest of your tenure in the organization. A few weeks ago, I invited Sue Zablud, an experienced consultant, executive coach, and trainer, to an interview for The Job Hunting Podcast Episode 68. She said, “In the first days in your new role, you should also consider what impression you want to make, your new manager’s expectations from you, your KPIs, and the adjustments you have to make to guarantee that you are the best fit for the organisation.”

Sue listed the two critical strategies you have to nail in the first days and weeks in a new job to advance and excel in your new organisation:

1. Achieve the outcome that you have promised. Do it well, and do it in a way that looks good for the organization instead of making you look good.

  • What are your new manager’s expectations of what you should do in your first few days?
  • What are your KPIs?
  • What do you need to do to ensure you will “fit” in the organization?

2. Build good relationships. This includes customer relationships, managing up, and demonstrating that you’re a good member of the team.

  • What is the impression that you want to make?
  • You have to get on with your team, be accepted by clients, and win your peers’ respect.

Above and beyond the probationary nature of the first 90 days in a new job, there is also a lot more at stake that can determine your new role’s success. Just because you were great in your last job does not mean you will be great in a new one. You have to be ready and have a plan. You can do this with a coach to understand what you should do to prepare for this period. Working with a coach is especially recommended if you are moving sideways (i.e., into a new industry or career track) or upwards (i.e., a more senior position).

Now that you have a clearer idea of how to leverage the power of your first 90 days, you can apply these strategies to a successful transition into a new role.

If you would like to learn more from me:

  • Visit my website: renatabernarde.com.
  • Listen to The Job Hunting Podcast on all good podcast apps, or find it here: renatabernarde.com/blog.
  • Sign up to Reset Your Career: a short course delivered in collaboration with the Slade team and available to you on-demand.
  • Sue Zablud delivers a special masterclass inside my signature program, Job Hunting Made Simple. Learn more about Job Hunting Made Simple and register for the next group intake.
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Preparing for a Post-Covid Turnover Boom

For most of last year, many employees were in survival mode, afraid to leave their current employer in fear of not finding work due to the pandemic. But now that vaccinations are underway and things are looking up, employers must be mindful of turnover as employees are more confidently feeling they can make moves.

One in four employees plans to leave their employer after the COVID-19 pandemic subsides, according to a new study from the IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV).

Findings of the January study of more than 14,000 people globally included:

  • 1 in 5 employees voluntarily changed employers in 2020 – Gen Z and Millennials make up the largest portion of this group.
  • Of the 28% of surveyed employees who plan to switch employers in 2021, the need for a more flexible work schedule or location, and increased benefits and support for their well-being were cited as top reasons why.
  • 1 in 4 surveyed employees indicated they plan to switch occupations in 2021 – more than 60% of this group had already changed employers in January.

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed employees’ expectations of their employers, and to retain top talent, employers need to understand employees’ motivations and needs. More than a third of respondents said they and their colleagues have asked their employer for more flexible work arrangements, improved compensation and benefits, and more physical and financial safety and security in the past year, but only about half of employees gave employers high marks on their ability to deliver this.

According to the survey, employees want:

  • work-life balance (51%)
  • career advancement opportunities (43%)
  • compensation and benefits (41%) *note: only 29% of Gen Z said this was key to their engagement
  • employer ethics and values (41%)
  • continuous learning opportunities (36%)
  • organizational stability (34%)

Some companies have rolled out Covid programs to boost employee satisfaction, offering things like free virtual healthcare, quarantine/confirmed illness pay, and a backup family care benefit. But there remains a gap – IBV found that “while 80% of executives said their companies were supporting the physical and emotional health of employees, only 46% of employees agreed.”

IBV’s Tips for employers:

  1. Proactively engage with employees to better understand what is really important to them and their careers. Employees are more likely to be their authentic selves and open up when employers have created a culture of belonging. Employees have options. They will gravitate towards employers who are listening and taking action.
  2. Foster a culture of perpetual learning that rewards continual skills growth. Most employees want to succeed and grow. Employers can either create learning cultures to nurture the skills and talents of their people, or wait for the exit interview to find out which of their competitors are.
  3. Don’t take people for granted. The pandemic has reminded us how fragile life is. Everyone has been through a lot in the past year. Employers must demonstrate empathy and care for their employees holistically—by considering their physical, mental, and financial well-being.

Priorities have shifted for employees due to the pandemic, and that means that leadership and executives must shift their thinking as well. To prepare for and hopefully stave off possible turnover, employers must create a supportive work environment, encourage open communication, embrace flexible work options, and provide learning and advancement opportunities. Employers must be mindful of how their employees are doing – burnout is running rampant as workers are attending more meetings, working after hours, and having to juggle balancing home/work life (including having children at home in remote learning situations).

This article was originally published by Liz Carey on the NPAworldwide blog.

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Navigating disappointment during internal recruitment

Recruiting from within can be a strategic and often efficient process for any organisation. Not only are you able to engage a candidate with existing knowledge of your workplace, products and/or services, but they are also often a relatively known commodity. In addition, knowing that there are opportunities for internal movement and advancement can help provide a strong incentive for employees to remain with your company as they can see potential to progress.

However internal recruitment processes can at times be somewhat difficult and must be undertaken with care so as to minimise the potential for a negative fallout from unsuccessful applicants. Where multiple internal applicants apply for an advertised position, there is likely to be at least some disappointed parties who may disagree with the hiring decision. Such feelings can run the risk of tension and/or jealousy arising, and employees may feel disheartened that they were not selected.

So as to assist in navigating what can at times be a challenging process, we have outlined below some steps that can be taken to help minimise the potential risks that can occur.

1. Undertake fair and consistent recruitment processes.

Ensure that your organisation has a formalised recruitment process in place so as to ensure that all candidates are managed consistently.

Ensure that your recruitment process for both internal and external recruitment activities mirror each other, with all candidates moving through the same selection process.

It is essential that the selection criteria for all advertised position is clearly set out and communicated. All applicants should be clear on what capabilities the successful candidate will need to possess for the role. 

2. Managing candidate rejection.

When advising an internal applicant that they have been unsuccessful, it is recommended that you have a face-to-face conversation with the applicant rather than providing them with notification of their application status via email.

Have a plan of what it is you would like to say to the employee. Doing so can assist you in not getting caught up in the emotions of the conversation. Make sure that you have allocated sufficient time to talk through the feedback with them.

Unsuccessful candidates may be sad and disappointed with the outcome of the recruitment process and may feel rejected. It is important to reassure them that they are a valued and appreciated employee despite not being the right fit for that particular opportunity.

3. Support your employees.

It is essential that your unsuccessful candidates continue to feel valued and supported so that they do not feel inclined to leave your business.

It is recommended that you work with each candidate to develop a plan or strategy that will help support them to continue to develop and achieve their career ambitions, where practicable. This is a good opportunity to work with the employee to review the strengths that they currently bring to your organisation and to identify any development and capability needs.

This article was originally published by HR Advice Online. For more information about our partnership, click here.

Information in HR Advice Online guides and blog posts is meant purely for educational discussion of human resources issues. It contains only general information about human resources matters and due to factors such as government legislation changes, may not be up-to-date at the time of reading. It is not legal advice and should not be treated as such.

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