The nuances of effective feedback

When Robyn, a great candidate referred by a trusted source, crashed and burned in an interview, I asked if she might be open to discussing how she felt about the interview. “Yes please!” This led to a great two-way conversation. But what if I had said, “You were terrible at interview and you have to take on the feedback I’m about to give you.”?

One of the most important skills we can all acquire is the gift of masterful feedback, both giving it and receiving it.

Instructive feedback encompasses both constructive feedback and informative feedback. The most useful feedback is both mindful and effective in empowering and influencing others. It is honest, unbiased and requested, rather than being thrust upon you. When you receive effective feedback, with no personal attachments and no hint of persuasion, it is all the more credible and importantly, able to be embraced and or even acted upon.

Uninvited feedback on the other hand, resulting from a reaction or response, can interrupt thoughts, kill motivation, learning and/or be annoying or even destructive, as it erodes trust and builds barriers. It can be particularly hurtful when it is directed at the other person’s values and beliefs or their judgements.

“The only fully legitimate feedback we can give a speaker is information about the state of our own cage.” – Mackay (1994)

Uninvited feedback can come from well-meaning friends, family or work colleagues, who believe it’s somehow their duty to tell you their observations or opinions to help you. Consciously they are trying to change you or maybe even communicate something about themselves, how they feel, think or respond. Subconsciously they may also be trying to sell their ideas, their experiences or get you to like them and be influenced by them.

It’s hard to accept uninvited feedback and take stock of the messages people dish out.  Receiving effective feedback is very different.

Effective feedback is provided in the most appropriate way so other person finds it useful and beneficial. A leader coaching their team or a peer, may use effective feedback to project back a particular perception, emotion, word, or experience observed. This could simply entail repeating back a certain word or phrase using active listening and recording a conversation.

When we clarify to capture meaning it also assists in the feedback process. It’s a bit like having another set of eyes and ears to help you gauge the message behind your words, your tone and feelings. Science tells us that we tend to operate more in the subconscious mind, than our conscious mind.  It’s clear that many of us go through life not being very aware of how we are perceived, the power of our thoughts and words, or their translation by others.

Successful executive coaching is underpinned by the use of effective feedback for this very reason; it creates increased clarity, trust, confidence and support. When a leader is able to regularly engage with feedback that is positive, that’s acknowledgement. When a leader is relaying feedback that has a negative effect, this can be referred to as feedback with judgement, which can often be received as criticism.

The more you pay conscious attention to how you and others provide effective feedback (clarification and or questioning without a tone of judgement) the further you empower others and yourself in your role. When you create a positive mindset for ongoing feedback in all its forms, you create greater synergy, trust and awareness.

How are you engaging in effective feedback in your world @work?

Sylvie Carter

Sylvie Carter has extensive experience in the Education and Government sectors, including national security, stakeholder engagement, business development, organisational change and workplace dynamics. She is experienced in strategy design and implementation and has held senior executive roles in private, public and not-for-profit organisations where she has brokered complex change and multi-party agreements with some of Australia's leading blue-chip companies including NRMA, Shell and BHP Billiton. Over the years Sylvie has provided numerous discrete global search and recruitment solutions for specialist roles within the Asia Pacific region. She has successfully conducted multiple senior-level management assignments and led organisational change, including large scale, multi-year business transformation projects. Her business acumen and acuity to ask the right questions to understand the issues and opportunities within your industry, informs her strategic sourcing success for attracting and engaging quality candidates with the right depth of leadership, talent and critical thinking skills.

Sylvie Carter
Senior Consultant
Slade Education
Level 7, 15 William Street
Melbourne VIC 3000
Tel: +61 3 9235 5100
scarter@sladegroup.com.au
sladegroup.com.au

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Posted in Slade Education, Slade Executive, The world @work
One comment on “The nuances of effective feedback
  1. Bhavini Ajmera says:

    I always prefer to provide constructive F/b so as to bring +ve change for the betterment of the project as well as for the self. This to me is always seen as a path towards a better move.

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