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How to work online, remain productive, and connect with people

I am always giving my clients tips on how to work online. Here are the key complaints I hear from clients and friends:

  • It’s hard to connect with people
  • It’s hard to keep productive
  • It’s lonely, and
  • There’s a tendency to work too much

 I feel this happens for several reasons:

  • We’re just not that used to it – yet
  • We are trying to work using old routines and models that are better suited for face to face
  • We still have a few issues feeling comfortable in front of a camera, or with technology in general, and
  • For those working from home, this means working from what is/was our personal space. Considering how much of our personal space we want to share on-screen is still something many are struggling with.

But, working online is now the main aspect of white-collar working life. Many office workers who, pre-pandemic, had to commute to work now can work remotely. Even if they go back to the office, you may find it empty, and most of the work you do is still in front of the computer anyway. So for transitional office-based companies, virtual companies, working for yourself, or job hunting, I hope you will find these tips helpful.

I work from home all day, every day. Here are my top tips:

1. Be ruthless with emails

I check them every day, early in the morning and last thing at night. I don’t advise everyone to do this; quite the contrary. I do it because it suits my line of work. It works for me because I have clients globally. I just invite you to consider the following: what email management routine will help you cope with your work? Then apply it daily, and stick to it.

Another email rule is that I don’t answer emails after hours or on the weekend. Many of my clients email me during the weekend because if they are working, this is the time they have to work on their career plans and job search. But I need my break; otherwise, I will burn out. I will still read the emails every morning, even on weekends, because I need to keep an eye on emergencies. If it’s not an emergency, it can wait.

2. GIFs and Emojis are fine

We need to find ways to show emotions when working online. I’ve learned to love to by observing how the millennials and Gen Z use them. I used to think they were childish. But now, I hardly see anyone face to face, and if an emoji will translate my facial expression or emotion and make people smile, then I am a fan. It’s important to be playful and have some fun during work. But keep in mind that you need to know when and who to send them to. Of course, GIFs and emojis are not for every communication. In my case, if you get an emoji from me, it’s because we’re already pals.

3. Videos and voice messages are your friend

I am addicted to Loom, a video messaging platform that has replaced at least half of my written emails. Here is an example: in this video, I am teaching how to disable the “People also viewed” box on LinkedIn. I always recommend that all my clients do this when they’re looking for work.

I copy-paste the link to the Loom video into an email, send it to a client, and this is how I coach between sessions. I also communicate with my family in Australia and overseas with voice messages on WhatsApp. This way, it’s more personal, and I don’t have to look at the screen and type all day. I can record when I’m walking. It’s much more fun for me to receive a voice message from a friend on the other side of the world than read her text.

4. Look good on video

  • Show up on camera as much as possible. There’s nothing worse for a meeting organizer or event speaker when everyone’s camera is off. I also believe it’s better for your career
  • Invest in a camera with clear image and audio. I will link here the camera I use. It sits either on my monitor or on a tripod
  • Have it at your eye-level
  • Ensure you have a background that denotes professionalism
  • Avoid fake and blurry backgrounds: they are suitable for emergencies, for example, if you’re traveling. Another exception is for corporate branding only, such as when you’re holding a public event or conference.

5. Create fun traditions and opportunities working online

I am a fan of a Zoom open-door policy. It’s like the old-fashion open door, but on Zoom, Google meet, or wherever you hold your online video meetings. I also know that some workplaces are trying new traditions such as trivia nights and drinks. And finally, make the most out of your online work environment by posting, sharing ideas, and contributing to others who take the lead and share. Please, everyone, try to give these a go.

6. Have at least two monitors

Having at least two monitors is an essential aspect of working online. It helps with so many different tasks. Drag and drop, presentation view, and working while checking the Slack activity. It ’s the best investment you will ever make.

7. Find time during the week to have real coffee with a colleague or a walking meeting. 

I know that for some people, the comfort of working from home is hard to give up. But it’s really important to maintain connections with colleagues and your professional network. In a few days, I will have a walking meeting with someone I have not seen for over two years. I am happy she reached out and glad that the pandemic has made it ok for us to have a professional conversation while walking on the beach, wearing leggings.

New times, new traditions!

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138. How to work online, remain productive, and connect with people

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This article was first published on the The Job Hunting Podcast Blog.

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Posted in Job Hunting Made Simple, The world @work

5 ways to increase your focus: 3 minute read

We live in a world that is accelerating: from our broadband to our transportation, to the fashion we buy, fast food we eat, home deliveries we order, even dating. You name it, we’re figuring out a way to make it happen faster. For many, a fast life is exhilarating and often gratifying, but there are some unfortunate truths to living at this continued upward pace. Burnout, hypervigilance and the erosion of focus are consequences of our existence at breakneck speed.

Since the dawn of the Net, the speed at which information is produced and distributed on mass has increased exponentially, which was researched and documented in a study by Dr Martin Hilbert and Dr Priscilla Lopez, in 2007. Lopez found that the average human, through television, social media, radio and reading, ingests a total of 174 86-page newspapers worth of information per day (and that was 15 years ago, imagine now!). This overstimulation of information isn’t compartmentalised well either; our brains often miss contextual clues, while the appetite to digest larger texts diminishes.  

So, why has the importance of slowing down become a thing, and what do we stand to gain from it?

On an individual level, paying attention improves your memory, which in turn is invaluable for academic and professional performance. The ability to maintain focus helps strengthen interpersonal relations and allows for more meaningful connections. You will notice the finer details during conversations, discerning facts from information and discovering forthcoming trends. You will become more patient, which by slowing down and being present, is a quality that can make your life much more fulfilling in the long run.

If you’re like me and would like to dial back our sense of urgency, you can read into this topic further. Stolen Focus by Johann Hari provides a sobering temperature check of our digital world and the impact it’s having on our ability to stay focused.

Below are five ways that are proven to increase your focus.

1. Mindfulness

There are mounds of evidence to suggest mindfulness training improves memory and other cognitive abilities. This doesn’t just mean sitting silently in a room either. Yoga, deep breathing and mindful appreciation will significantly improve attention and focus.

2. Exercise

Regular exercise can help improve both concentration and attention after just four weeks. Other research looking at older adults suggests just a year of moderate aerobic activity can help stop or even reverse memory loss.

3. Improved sleep

Sleep deprivation can disrupt concentration, as well as other cognitive functions, including memory and attention. Regularly failing to get seven to eight hours of sleep a night can also affect your mood and performance at work.

4. Spending time in nature

If you live near a park, have a garden or even a backyard, make sure to step outside and get some sun! Try also adding a succulent or two to your workspace or home office for a range of positive benefits. Any natural environment encourages appreciation for the present, which provides a boost in your concentration.

5. Take a break

A digital detox might sound daunting, but several social experiments have found that taking a scheduled break away from your smartphone or digital device can significantly lower your stress levels. There are plenty of apps, including Freedom, that can provide a welcome respite from the noise of social media.

References

Ph.D. student calculates how much information is in the world
USC Annenberg, 17 June 2015

Humans have shorter attention span than goldfish, thanks to smartphones
The Telegraph, 15 May 2015

You Now Have a Shorter Attention Span Than a Goldfish
Time, 14 May 2015

News Consumption Across Social Media in 2021
Pew Research Center

Moderate Exercise May Improve Memory in Older Adults
National Institutes of Health, 28 February 2011

Putting a Finger on Our Phone Obsession
Dscout, 16 June 2016

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Posted in Interchange Bench, The world @work

Preparing for a Post-Covid Turnover Boom

For most of last year, many employees were in survival mode, afraid to leave their current employer in fear of not finding work due to the pandemic. But now that vaccinations are underway and things are looking up, employers must be mindful of turnover as employees are more confidently feeling they can make moves.

One in four employees plans to leave their employer after the COVID-19 pandemic subsides, according to a new study from the IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV).

Findings of the January study of more than 14,000 people globally included:

  • 1 in 5 employees voluntarily changed employers in 2020 – Gen Z and Millennials make up the largest portion of this group.
  • Of the 28% of surveyed employees who plan to switch employers in 2021, the need for a more flexible work schedule or location, and increased benefits and support for their well-being were cited as top reasons why.
  • 1 in 4 surveyed employees indicated they plan to switch occupations in 2021 – more than 60% of this group had already changed employers in January.

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed employees’ expectations of their employers, and to retain top talent, employers need to understand employees’ motivations and needs. More than a third of respondents said they and their colleagues have asked their employer for more flexible work arrangements, improved compensation and benefits, and more physical and financial safety and security in the past year, but only about half of employees gave employers high marks on their ability to deliver this.

According to the survey, employees want:

  • work-life balance (51%)
  • career advancement opportunities (43%)
  • compensation and benefits (41%) *note: only 29% of Gen Z said this was key to their engagement
  • employer ethics and values (41%)
  • continuous learning opportunities (36%)
  • organizational stability (34%)

Some companies have rolled out Covid programs to boost employee satisfaction, offering things like free virtual healthcare, quarantine/confirmed illness pay, and a backup family care benefit. But there remains a gap – IBV found that “while 80% of executives said their companies were supporting the physical and emotional health of employees, only 46% of employees agreed.”

IBV’s Tips for employers:

  1. Proactively engage with employees to better understand what is really important to them and their careers. Employees are more likely to be their authentic selves and open up when employers have created a culture of belonging. Employees have options. They will gravitate towards employers who are listening and taking action.
  2. Foster a culture of perpetual learning that rewards continual skills growth. Most employees want to succeed and grow. Employers can either create learning cultures to nurture the skills and talents of their people, or wait for the exit interview to find out which of their competitors are.
  3. Don’t take people for granted. The pandemic has reminded us how fragile life is. Everyone has been through a lot in the past year. Employers must demonstrate empathy and care for their employees holistically—by considering their physical, mental, and financial well-being.

Priorities have shifted for employees due to the pandemic, and that means that leadership and executives must shift their thinking as well. To prepare for and hopefully stave off possible turnover, employers must create a supportive work environment, encourage open communication, embrace flexible work options, and provide learning and advancement opportunities. Employers must be mindful of how their employees are doing – burnout is running rampant as workers are attending more meetings, working after hours, and having to juggle balancing home/work life (including having children at home in remote learning situations).

This article was originally published by Liz Carey on the NPAworldwide blog.

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COVID-19 continues to change how we work. Could it be for the better?

Living in Australia and having experienced the Stage 4 lockdowns in Victoria, it is apparent that this pandemic has changed how we work. The question now is, could it be for the better?

Last month our team joined the SEEK Insight & Innovation 2020 digital event, a seminar which was informative and well executed.

Some of the ideas presented really stem from taking the time to be considerate of the massive upheaval experienced by many people across the world, and I am pleased to say Slade Group has been carrying them through: increasing employee engagement; adapting to new ways of working, primarily working from home (especially for those who are in roles that are not usually accustomed to working from home); investing in new technology; innovating our service delivery and diversifying our service offering.   

While at this stage ‘Covid Normal’ is still being defined, according to the statistics presented by SEEK, a massive 41% of people are rethinking their careers. The cycle of travelling to work, working long hours, travelling home, rushing the family meal, ferrying children to sports and other extra curricular activities, spending the whole weekend doing the same things… and then starting it all over again – isn’t appealing anymore.

Covid has given us the capacity to explore what we may be able to achieve without the usual routine we have just accepted as ‘life’, which statistics are saying isn’t desirable anymore.

It used to be cool to be ‘super busy’ because you were ‘successful’ and didn’t have time for anyone or anything. With the benefit of lockdown hindsight, we can recognise a few home truths: You may not be suited to the role you are doing, or you may have had too many roles (paid or unpaid) with too much on your plate. Were you making excuses not to catch up with someone you would really have liked to spend time with or to take time out for yourself?

With just over one month left in 2020, what are the insights for next year? I think most would agree taking care of our health is much higher on the agenda. Working from home in some capacity is here to stay. If your current role doesn’t provide the flexibility to reset the balance or you’ve had a break from the workforce and are looking to get your career back on track, what would be challenging and stimulating?

My team at Slade Group are assisting our client organisations to develop the culture and strategies that will allow them to be successful in a post Covid world @work. At the same time, we are helping candidates to reinvent themselves and find their perfect role, not simply because it’s our job, or to do our part to reduce the unemployment rate (since the pandemic, the highest in over 20 years) and rebuild the economy. We are looking forward to a new normal where personal life and business life happily coexist, so you may need to find another reason to not catch up with that person you have been putting off. 😊

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Posted in Technical & Operations, The world @work

Daily performance reviews and clearing the clutter: 15 tips for those working from home

Having left a secure executive position with IBM for the insecurity of starting my own business, I sometimes struggled in a home office before expanding into ‘real’ commercial office space to accommodate staff.

Now, like many others, I find myself back working from home, so here are some tips, gleaned over many years, to those experiencing this for the first time; thankfully with benefits of technology that weren’t available 25 years ago.  

Discipline

Self-discipline is vital, especially when you’re accountable to no one but yourself and your clients, or less accountable to a remote boss.

Ironically, you go into your own business for the flexibility of working independently, but without the healthy discipline to show up and put the time in, you won’t last long.

Time is your main finite currency and can’t be wasted on TV, social media or endlessly tidying cupboards. 

Routine

Flexibility is indeed a bonus of working from home, but for maximum productivity, you need some routine in place — not the one imposed by others, but the self-imposed schedule that you stick to most workdays.

It may not be 9-5, but set that alarm for a regular start. 

For example, my day starts at 7am with a hot lemon drink and listening to the news as I skim emails from overseas that arrive overnight. Urgent ones are answered and the rest prioritised, before putting on laundry, and going for swim, followed by quick, healthy breakfast. ‘Real’ work may not start until 10am when I sit down at PC to fully focus. 

Boundaries

Tell friends and family you’re there for them in an emergency, but that you need to limit social chit chat to certain times of the day, before or after your working hours (whatever they may be).

When I started working from home, I had to remind friends that I was self-employed-not unemployed! And even if you are unemployed, it may be part of your daily ‘job’ to actively seek a job.

Devote the discipline, focus and time to do so. Endless hours on the phone complaining about things won’t help.

Focus and prioritise

If you need to concentrate on a big project, put your phone on silent in another room with a recorded message of when you’ll return calls. Obviously that won’t work for all occupations, but most of us don’t really need to be in response mode 24/7. 

Visible goals, purpose and outcomes

To avoid being easily distracted, have your important goals, outcomes and purpose clearly visible.

These will serve as a constant reminder that all tasks should contribute to those ends, and that it’s not necessary to reply to every email or read every article that comes across your virtual desk.

Daily to-do list

As well as the big picture plan, have a daily to-do list. Commit a certain number of hours per day to your key big goal and other tasks that require completion. Maybe three key things that must be done that day and five more you’d like to do.

Rather than chance it to memory, you’ll not only achieve more but have a sense of satisfaction as you tick things off.

Outsource

As much as possible, focus on your big goals and outsource more mundane tasks, those you don’t like doing or ones that others can do better than you. Think cleaning, database, bookkeeper accountant, IT specialist, virtual PA, et cetera.

Play to your strengths and get help with your weaknesses.

Batch tedious tasks and calls

For greater productivity, ask yourself: ‘What will be my best use of time today? Tomorrow? This week? This month?’

For example, I have a ‘finance Friday’ to handle all things financial, rather than deal with bills and invoices as they arrive.  

Deadlines

At business school, I vividly remember reading The Peter Principle, in which, among other things, author Laurence Peters postulates that most tasks expand to fill the available time. 

Nothing happens without a deadline; or very little does. As a writer and professional speaker, nothing focuses my mind and my work activity more sharply than a deadline from a publisher or approaching conference, when the luxury of creative thinking vanishes to give way to completion.

So, it’s necessary to set self-imposed deadlines for important tasks.

And by the way, there is never enough time for entrepreneurial thinking people to do all the things they’d like to do. 

Clear the clutter

It’s an old habit from my IBM career, because the company insisted on a clean desk policy before employees left the office. It’s served me well even when I’m the only person who might ever see that messy desk.

Messy desk equals messy mind, so my home workspace is clear at the end of each day (whenever the end of that day may be) with my to-do list ready for the next day to start afresh with a clean slate.  

Maintain high standards

Don’t let standards slip. OK, so there were times the laptop balanced on knees while I sat in my Qantas pyjamas. But avoid this. It’s easy to slip into the groove of hanging around the house like a total slob.

I know one person who walks around the block and back into his home office at 8.30am every morning, and another who still dons lipstick while home alone, even if they have no zoom calls that day. Do whatever works to help you work in this new environment. 

Personally, I’m looking for time delay lock on the fridge, but the best I can do is to physically shut the door to the home office and set a timer that I won’t even think of leaving the chair even a second before. Yes, more discipline.  

Practice a healthy lifestyle

People often ask me how I find time to exercise. It has always been an essential activity for me. It is not a waste of time and an integral part of my daily routine regardless of what work pressures may loom.

We can’t take care of our clients or family if we don’t take care of ourselves!

This may sound somewhat obsessive, but I actually have it at the top of my daily to-do list, and the mere fact of checking it off gives me a strange sense of achieving at least one of my goals for the day. 

I also have ‘stretch’ on my daily list as a reminder to occasionally give those shoulders and neck a break. 

Performance review

At the end of each day, have a 60-second review as you brush your teeth and honestly assess those last 24 hours.

We’re all prone to beat ourselves up for what we haven’t achieved because of some frustration (often a result of technology and/or bureaucracy glitches beyond our control).

Take the time to reflect, and possibly journal, all the things you have achieved and everything that you’re grateful for, even if it hasn’t been a perfect day.

Time out

While a focus on discipline is essential, sometimes we do indeed need to be a little gentler with ourselves.   

When enough is enough?

Admittedly, that’s a lesson I’m still working on, but most self-employed people and self-starters always have a steady stream of new ideas, which means their to-do list is never completely done.

So do take some time to smell the roses or appreciate that view.

Rewards

Apart from the obvious financial rewards of working productively from home, set your own rewards when you reach certain goals. It may be an annual dream vacation (when travel resumes), a monthly manicure (when that resumes), a weekly TV binge or a daily treat.

This article was originally published on SmartCompany. Reproduced with permission from the author.

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Posted in The world @work

Lessons from Mother Nature for human nature and Human Resources

Most organisations today are aware of their environmental impact and responsibility. But beyond any legislative requirements, are there lessons from nature that may boost resilience among employees?

And before you cynically dismiss this thought as too ‘touchy-feely’, think of scientist Albert Einstein’s comment “Look deep into nature; then you will understand everything better”. Recruiting and HR professionals appreciate that there have always been (and probably will always be) the darkest of disasters in both Mother Nature and human nature.

Thankfully few of us will ever face tragedy that strikes with the strength and speed of tornadoes and tsunamis, or with the ferocity of floods and forest fires. Yet most of us do indeed confront crises that can instantly change the course of our lives, eclipsing not only our dreams but also our desire to carry on.

I know because I’ve been there.

Misfortune strikes everyone sooner or later. In my case, it was long before I was HR Manager for IBM’s Asia Pacific headquarters in Tokyo. I started life in an orphanage, lost both adopted parents to cancer the year I graduated from university, faced that dreaded disease myself long after my divorce, and fractured a vertebrae to be told I’d never play sport again. Shift happens!

Although the ‘f’ is often omitted, shift happens not only in fault-lines of the Earth but also in the faults and frailties of its inhabitants. Budget cuts, redundancies and takeovers may not be life-threatening for some but rather paradigms shift in both our personal and professional lives. And whether change is referred to as disruption or transformation, it still creates stress that everyone from the CEO to the most junior employee must deal with.

We need to re-charge not just our devices but ourselves.

My own energy always seemed boosted amidst nature. Climbing in the sublime silence of the Antarctic, strolling along a beach or gazing at a beautiful garden all offered their inexplicable breath of fresh air for my soul.

Only while writing my latest book, The Gift of Nature; Inspiring Hope & Resilience, did I discover why. Research from leading universities now offers scientific evidence that time spent in nature does indeed contribute to better mental well-being.

Employees who are mentally and physically healthy are surely happier. And there is little doubt that happy employees yield happier customers, which in turn yield better returns and stronger organisations. And whether you’re a CEO or just joined the organisation yesterday, you can’t take care of others if you don’t take care of yourself!

So here’s a few simple nature-related tips to help cope with that feeling of being overwhelmed those of us working in HR have all felt from time to time:

Don’t make mountains out of molehills, play the blame game or make excuses. It might not be fair and it might not be your fault – but it is still your responsibility to deal with it. For perspective ask yourself this: will this matter in five or 10 years’ time?

Do get moving and stop moping. You don’t need to scale the Himalayas but never underestimate the rejuvenating powers of getting out in nature for a walk on a beach, in a park or in your own garden.

Do re-charge your high tech world amidst the high touch world of nature. We’re so busy being busy that we overlook the importance of balance and unless you’re an emergency worker, you don’t need your phone on 24/7.

Do get eight hours sleep a night and sleep on it before making any major life decision. Take time to breathe in fresh air as you inhale the future and exhale the past.

Do talk to a trusted friend or health care professional. A problem shared can be a problem halved and never be too proud to ask for help.

Do fill your mind with positive thoughts. We are bombarded with the worst aspects of Mother Nature (typhoons, tsunamis, drought etc) and human nature (bullying, abuse, corruption, violence etc). So if a beautiful quote or photo from books, music or art resonates with you, put it on your fridge or bathroom mirror as a daily reminder to soothe your battered soul.

When you’re embroiled in the many faceted and increasingly complex world of recruitment and HR, when you can’t see the forest for the trees, when everything under the sun seems bleak and when you think no one else understands or has been there, think again. And know that lessons from Mother Nature can help you weather the inevitable storms of life. Such is the power of nature amidst the random nature of being alive.

And remember, life does indeed mirror nature – some of its tragic but most of its magic!

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Money can’t buy you happiness, but flexible working can.

Flexibility now ranks top amongst what’s important to employees (even more than pay), but what does it mean in practice?

Flexible working arrangements can come in many forms. For some people being flexible will mean compressing a five day week into four days; for others it will just be having a long lunch break to fit in a gym session. For many it is just being trusted to get the job done in the timeframe required, no matter where or when you do so. Trust people to do their job and more often than not, they will repay by putting in greater effort whilst working.

For employers, the tangible benefits of workplace flexibility include: reduction in absenteeism, increase in employee morale, higher engagement, greater commitment and improved retention. In fact over 55% of millennials are expected to stay more than five years when given more flexibility at work [Deloitte Millennials Survey]. However there are downsides to promoting some aspects of flexibility, such as working from home. When people are not present in the office it can impact the social aspect of working face-to-face in a team. Despite our connected business world, working remotely online can lead to disconnection or even loneliness. Roles that require regular open and collaborative communication can also be frustrated by flexible working.  A lot of managers report finding it hard to adapt to managing people who they can’t see, which means we still need to work on addressing those concerns.

On the upside, allowing employees to work flexibly can have a massive impact on people’s health. Stress is well-known to be one of the biggest causes of illness, leading to a number of other physical health related problems. For those of us who never seem to have personal time, flexible working hours reduce the stress caused by other pressures in life, allowing us to adapt our schedules to accommodate commitments such as family, sports activities, other hobbies and interests or just get a few chores done. It further relieves pressure on transport infrastructure, saving commuting time, which has environmental and health benefits for those travelling as well.

A major downside to flexible working is that it doesn’t suit everyone, nor every job. Flexible working doesn’t work for people who can’t motivate themselves; some people need supervision to get on with the job. With flexibility comes responsibility, so while there’s no harm in putting on a load of washing while you work, other distractions (your phone, social media, online shopping, what’s going on outside…) are still present. Some managers are still beholden to presenteeism, so if you’re not seen, you may be overlooked to contribute on interesting projects or miss out on career development opportunities.

I understand that flexible working isn’t for everyone and some jobs just aren’t that flexible. But I do think that the advantages outweigh the disadvantages and more people should be given flexible working opportunities. Would anyone begrudge that spending a few more hours each week with their families and friends, enjoying hobbies, reading, exercising and travelling wouldn’t have a positive impact on their professional life? To varying degrees it’s already happening in some industries. It’s up to us to make it work.

 

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Why you should listen to podcasts and why we’re a sponsor.

What is it about podcasts that have captured our collective earbuds? Have you noticed how at some point the watercooler chat moved from TV’s Better Call Saul to the LA Times’ Dirty John podcast? Perhaps it’s because podcasts are the better versions of the internet, screen, radio and TV that they’re experiencing the highest growth of all media. The latest figures (ABC 2017) show that 89% of us are aware of podcasts and 30% of us listened to at least one in the last month. And if we’re anything like the US, annual audiences are growing at a double digit rate.

We’re proud to make a shout out for our own sponsorship of the highly engaging Don’t Shoot the Messenger podcast.  The Interchange Bench, which specialises in temporary and contract talent for all reasons and seasons sees Don’t Shoot the Messenger as the perfect podcast partner.  Quite apart from the tremendous content, it has an AB demographic: an audience of professionals and hiring decision-makers, many of whom will consider professional contract roles at some stage in their careers.

Caroline Wilson and Corrie Perkin, the co-hosts of Don’t Shoot the Messenger, talk about everything from footy to politics, dubious characters, food, films and books, family and business are all covered in an hour, and seemingly, not much is off limits.

We could have pursued a partnership with a related HR, leadership and recruitment podcast but we’re firmly in the ‘Love Work, Love Life’ camp and believe life outside the office, the lecture theatre or operating theatre, the building site or science lab is just as important for a balanced life. (And this month, especially outside the chambers of Parliament House!)

Of course if you are interested in HR and Hiring podcasts, give these a shot: Engaging Leader, hosted by Jesse Lahey; The Go-Giver, hosted by Bob Burg; Leadership and Loyalty, hosted by Dov Baron; HR Happy Hour by Steve Boese and Trish McFarlane.  We think they’re great.

So back to the original question – why the shift to podcasts?

You may have your own reasons, here are five reasons why they’re a 21st Century thing:

We’re commuters: Walking, public transport or cars are all conducive to podcast listening.

We choose: 1000 topics, 1000 interests. Just like having the State Library on your iPhone.

Production quality:  Beautifully crafted stories, sophisticated discussions and documentaries.

Independent media: Consolidation and decimation of some media has been matched by the growth of the intelligent green shoot podcast.

Long form:  There’s been a shift from the 10 second sound grab, to a demand for deep dive discussions into topics of interest.

Listen to Don’t Shoot the Messenger now or subscribe through Apple Podcasts and let us know what you think!

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