Blog Archives

The secret to a successful career transition: Five key strategies to guide you towards your new job.

Whether you’ve been job searching for months or you have just started, I encourage you to press reset, sharpen your focus and go through the list of key success factors below. Make sure you are reviewing and addressing them every day during your transition. I hope that by being strategic and building a healthy job search routine, you will – like my clients – have a shorter transition that leads to the best possible outcome for you in 2021.

Regardless of the magnitude of your career goals: be it finding a similar job or making a bolder career change, the strategies below will help make your pitch crystal clear to recruiters and hiring managers:

  1. Understand who you are as a professional and what you offer to employers. Find out what your strengths and transferable skills are. Even though different sectors require different expertise, they need common essential skills, such as communication, analytical skills, people skills, etc. Please write down your transferable skills and include them in your job search materials, not as a jumble of words, but as the most relevant competencies applied to you. Whether it be an interview, your resume, or in your profile, ensure you can speak confidently about the skills you listed and that you have robust examples to back them up.
  2. Ask yourself, what industry, sector, and organisations do you want to work for? If you are unsure where to go next and curious about industries and companies you don’t know, investigate. You can read about them, and most importantly, talk to professionals who work there. Draw on your network, or start building one. For example, you can tap into your university’s Alumni, former colleagues, and friends. Think outside the box, talk to people from different areas and sectors. Then make sure you make these decisions before you start your job search. Yes, you can revisit later. In fact, you should be reviewing your job search strategy constantly. But sharpen your focus on the industries, sectors, and companies before going to market. Otherwise, there’s a great chance you will feel overwhelmed and pulled in too many directions.
  3. Once you identify your preferred industry, find out what knowledge, qualifications, experience, and skills are valued by the hiring managers. Your research will provide you with important clues that you should use to draft your cover letters, resumes and LinkedIn profile. It should also guide the way to interact with recruiters and even which recruiters to interact with. A good sector analysis will help you learn the sector’s language so you can better explain in writing and conversations how your strengths and transferable skills can support your new career transition. You will feel more confident about your prospects at this stage.
  4. Find a coach to support your transition or at least a mentor. It is not easy to shift sectors, and having a mentor can help access information to support the transition. And learning how to play the game and win as a job candidate in a sea of highly qualified peers is a steep learning curve. Investing in help at this stage can shave off weeks or months of unemployment, as well as keep you operating at high performance and low-stress levels. It is a competition, and there’s no way around it. The top players usually have top help. Be one of them.
  5. Know your values. What sort of culture and what kind of organization brings out the best in you? For example, do you work better in an organization where there is a lot of autonomy? Or do you work better in an organization where you’re part of a team? Use the interviewing process to learn more about the organisation, the same way they are using it to learn more about you. Values alignment will make a difference in how long you stay in that organization. Don’t just take the first thing that rolls up along the aisle because it could be a disaster. Transitions can be stressful, but you don’t want to regret your move a few months down the track because you took the first offer, and now you’re miserable again. I’m assuming you can have the privilege of making the most out of your transition period. However, if your situation requires you to find a job quickly, then it may have to be first in best dressed. In that case, don’t forget to keep working on your future career steps and don’t take too long to move again.

Keep in mind: success occurs when opportunity meets preparation. Next month, I will be discussing the importance of the first ninety days into a role and how you need to start preparing and planning for it before you start your new job.

If you would like to learn more from me:

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Posted in Job Hunting Made Simple, The world @work

5 tips for storytelling like Jesus and some not-so-ancients

Rumour has it I’ve been storytelling since biblical times (remember those parables Jesus told in the Bible, The Good Samaritan and The Tax Collector?)… Well, it’s true that I love a good story!

And it seems storytelling has had a rebirth according to self-help guru Tony Robbins; there’s strategy in telling your story. Social media and bloggers are in on the content marketing bandwagon too (check out my articles on LinkedIn here and on our Slade Report blog here), but seriously, storytelling been around forever.

Whether you’re job interviewing, selling something, making a business case or trying to get a deal over the line, here’s my 5 tips for using storytelling as part of your pitch:

  1. Facts, figures and statistics – use numbers to back your case up
  2. Examples and case studies – paint the ‘picture’ that you’ve done this before, and you know your stuff
  3. Demonstrations – sometimes people to need to ‘see’ it in action
  4. Less is more – you’ve got their attention, but don’t go on talking forever
  5. Structure it like a STAR – What was the Situation, Task or Action and Result achieved?

Storytelling is a great business skill. In a consulting environment it helps me to be more persuasive to clients and candidates, to empathise with my customers’ problems and find great solutions.

We’ll still be meeting on Zoom or Teams for some time, but as we start to get on top of Covid in Australia, I can’t wait to see people face-to-face and return to doing business in person again.

So next time you need to be really persuasive, definitely don’t talk too much, but rather tell your great story using any five of our friends above.

If you’ve got a good story to tell, we’d love to hear it. Let me know about it by posting a comment below.

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Posted in Consumer, Sport & Entertainment, The world @work

The Goldilocks of HR Advice

Not too small, not too big, just right.

It’s 3.00pm on a Friday and you’re asked, “What’s the policy on Social Media?” You realise you haven’t seen updated policies for over 12 months and you’re not sure your organisation has a Social Media Policy. Help!

No matter how big or how small an organisation, there are head-scratching HR issues you just wish you could talk through with someone.

At Slade Group, we’re no different. We have to stay close to all HR and labour legislation, Fair Work, Awards and all relevant rulings.  We’re not big enough to warrant a full-time in-house People and Culture leader, but we’re in an industry that has to be absolutely attuned to the world of Human Resources.   

This is our Secret Santa gift to you… HR Advice Online is like that product or service you didn’t know had been invented, and then when you find out about it you think, why didn’t I think of that!?

Your delight will be like ours when you discover there’s now a service where you can talk to a live qualified HR practitioner about all those things that would normally keep you up at night:

  • Which award, if any, are my employees covered by?
  • My business only has a small number of employees, so can I terminate an employee at any time?
  • Annual Leave Loading – we don’t need to pay that?
  • What do I need to have in place for employees working from home?
  • We pay above the Award, so therefore we’re not covered by the Award, right?

If you’d like to know more, let us know and we’ll put you in touch with the right people, or have a look at our HR Advice Online page under the Employer Services section on our website. 

Sweet dreams and a happy New Year!

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Posted in The world @work

Has COVID-19 derailed your career?

Renata Bernarde interviews Geoff Slade for The Job Hunting Podcast

Renata Bernarde, career planning expert and creator of the online coaching program, Job Hunting Made Simple, talks to Geoff Slade about how the global pandemic is affecting the careers of corporate professionals. Geoff shares what he has seen and learned from previous downturns, common misunderstandings about the selection process and the role of the recruiter, and highlights the importance of ongoing training and networking.

Click here to watch the video…

Other episodes in the same series:


Has COVID-19 derailed your career?

We invite you to a webinar that Slade Group are presenting on Tuesday 27 October 2020 for those candidates we have had involvement with over the past couple of years, and whose career may have been affected by COVID-19, or who simply would like to re-set their career ambitions.

The webinar, which runs from 9am to 1pm, will be hosted by Renata Bernarde, the creator of the Job Hunting Made Simple educational program, and widely regarded as “the expert” in providing advice on job hunting in Australia. Renata will be supported on the day (remember it’s October 27th) by Slade Group’s Executive team.

In recognition of the fact that many people have been displaced during this pandemic, Slade Group have negotiated a special arrangement with Renata, reducing the cost of the webinar by more than 30% using the discount code SLADE2020 when booking . If you are interested, we do highly recommend it to you and you should find it will give you some very practical, and useable techniques if you are searching for a new career opportunity.

Click here for full details…

We look forward to seeing you there!

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Posted in The world @work

Video meetings and interviews – Tips and Tricks!

There’s no doubt that a video interview has become an acceptable step in the hiring process. It has proven positive results, as well as delivering tangible time and cost savings for all involved. So whilst we’re anticipating a return to Real Life interviews, candidates are advised to master the virtual interviews – they’re here to stay.

For candidates preparing for TZ (Teams/Zoom) interviewing, we’re sharing some insiders’ tips to ensure the unfamiliar becomes familiar and less unnerving.

Here’s a pocket guide to online interviews and meetings.

The key is preparation.

AS ALWAYS: Do your research on the company, gather information on its history, culture, key employees and recent performance. Prepare 2-3 questions you can ask at the end of the interview. Is it about to embark on major growth and expansion? What is their policy regarding flexible working arrangements? This will demonstrate your interest in the job and that you have done your due diligence.

Before the interview identify the activities and accomplishments in your background that would demonstrate you are the most qualified candidate for the position.

SET UP: Establish a space where you are facing an open window or light. Ideally, that means your computer screen sits between you and the source of light. In this way your face will be well lit and you won’t be a dark shape against a strong backdrop of light.

Make sure your are seated, or standing in such a way that your face is well centred on the screen and your screen isn’t pointing up to the ceiling, but rather projects a line of sight parallel with the floor.

As with all meetings maintaining eye contact is essential to ensure you are engaging with your audience and especially if this a job interview. Nothing is more distracting than to be constantly looking down at your notes. One solution is to place post it notes around the perimeter of your screen or immediately behind it. These should be key points not a script; if you have done your homework these act as prompts.

DRESS: Dress appropriately for the role as if you were going to a physical interview and check the background behind you.

LISTEN: Listen carefully to the questions, you want to be able to address questions succinctly and clearly; if it is not clear, ask for clarification to ensure you are providing the information required. Nothing is more off putting than a rambling answer. If it takes you more than two minutes, you have probably gone off script!

THE MUTE BUTTON: Don’t panic, we all do it, but make sure you ask people to repeat themselves if you didn’t hear them, or be comfortable to repeat yourself if you forgot to unmute or you have a poor connection.

FOLLOW UP: On completing the interview email your thanks and ongoing interest in the position; this will most likely ensure you stand out from other candidates.

Finally and most importantly, breathe!

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Posted in Slade Executive

3 surefire ways to stand out in a crowded job market

In the current market where unemployment is at 7.4% and underemployment is at 11.7%, as a recruiter I am constantly speaking with candidates who are looking for new roles.

At the same time, I’m speaking to our existing clients regarding their needs and building new relationships with employers who are already time poor and potentially looking through hundreds of applications.

It’s a tough time to stand out from the crowd. What can you do to help your application be seen?

Below are my top 3 tips to help you stand out, particularly at the very beginning of the application process.

  1. Re-evaluate your resume

A well-presented resume has moved beyond a list of roles and duties; employers want to see specific skills and key achievements and how they have been demonstrated in each role. And good news if you aren’t familiar with clean and simple layout styles, you don’t need to work in graphic design to create a visually appealing document!

If it has been a while since you updated your resume, re-evaluate it through the following lenses:

  • Is it concise?
  • Is it targeted to the job?

DO: Make your resume visually appealing and easy to read. Use short, direct sentences or dot points, and tweak your resume for each job application. Save your resume in a common document format, such as Word or PDF.

DON’T: Don’t exceed three pages as a general rule. Don’t assume the same resume is suitable for every job you apply for. Once you’ve established a career path, we don’t need to know about your high school job at the fish and chip shop.

WHY IT MATTERS: A good resume can be the difference between receiving an initial call or being ruled out as not suitable. Make sure that your resume accurately describes your professional skills and experience, and showcases how you tick all (or most) of the boxes for a successful applicant.

  1. Be prepared, know the job

When you apply for a role, be prepared to receive a call from the recruiter or the hiring manager. It’s frustrating on both sides speaking with a candidate who does not remember what the role is or even applying for the position!

When applying for multiple positions, write a list, set-up a spreadsheet or find another way of keeping track of those jobs and the organisations you have submitted your application to (some job boards facilitate this). More importantly, keep a record of why you applied.

Once you submit an application, add it to your list and jot down three things you liked about the role that made you want to apply. That way, when you receive a call, you will have a cheat sheet to jog your memory.

DO: Keep a record of the roles you apply for and what you liked about the role. Be prepared for a call and refer to your notes about why you’re suitable and why you want the job.

DON’T: Don’t try to wing it and hope for the best. If you’ve kept notes, you won’t be caught off guard by questions such as, “Why did you apply for this role?” or “What will you bring to this role?”

WHY IT MATTERS: This is your opportunity to really impress a hiring manager or recruiter with your level of preparation, to convey yourself as a candidate who is keen, on-the-ball and knows what they want!

  1. Communicate well – answer your phone

Even though we’re now accustomed to text messages or communicating via social apps, the first point of contact from a prospective employer will often be a phone call.

It is good manners if you don’t know who the caller is to greet them and to identify yourself when you pick up the call: “Hello, this is Hayley” or “Good afternoon, Hayley speaking” would suffice. This way the caller knows that they are (or aren’t!) speaking to the right person, and it provides them an opening to introduce themselves and the reason for their call.

If you don’t normally use voicemail, consider setting one up while you are applying for jobs. It should tell the caller who they are leaving a message for and invite them to leave their name, contact number and the reason for their call. If you already have a voicemail set up, review your message to check that it meets these criteria and that the recording is clear and easy to understand, without any background noise.

DO: Treat your phone like a business phone – answer politely, greet the caller and identify yourself, set up your voicemail message with a brief instructional message in your own voice.

DON’T: Don’t wait for the caller to speak first or answer an unknown number in a casual or rude way. It’s preferable not to use voice to text messaging services or other automated voicemail services that limit a caller’s ability to leave you a detailed message. Please don’t make a joke out of your voicemail – it won’t be funny if an important caller hangs up!

WHY IT MATTERS: This is your opportunity to make a good first impression and position yourself with a personal brand for being a good communicator. Simply being friendly and polite can set you apart from other applicants.

What are you doing to stand out from the crowd? What are some of the strategies that have worked well for you?

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Posted in Interchange Bench, The world @work

Daily performance reviews and clearing the clutter: 15 tips for those working from home

Having left a secure executive position with IBM for the insecurity of starting my own business, I sometimes struggled in a home office before expanding into ‘real’ commercial office space to accommodate staff.

Now, like many others, I find myself back working from home, so here are some tips, gleaned over many years, to those experiencing this for the first time; thankfully with benefits of technology that weren’t available 25 years ago.  

Discipline

Self-discipline is vital, especially when you’re accountable to no one but yourself and your clients, or less accountable to a remote boss.

Ironically, you go into your own business for the flexibility of working independently, but without the healthy discipline to show up and put the time in, you won’t last long.

Time is your main finite currency and can’t be wasted on TV, social media or endlessly tidying cupboards. 

Routine

Flexibility is indeed a bonus of working from home, but for maximum productivity, you need some routine in place — not the one imposed by others, but the self-imposed schedule that you stick to most workdays.

It may not be 9-5, but set that alarm for a regular start. 

For example, my day starts at 7am with a hot lemon drink and listening to the news as I skim emails from overseas that arrive overnight. Urgent ones are answered and the rest prioritised, before putting on laundry, and going for swim, followed by quick, healthy breakfast. ‘Real’ work may not start until 10am when I sit down at PC to fully focus. 

Boundaries

Tell friends and family you’re there for them in an emergency, but that you need to limit social chit chat to certain times of the day, before or after your working hours (whatever they may be).

When I started working from home, I had to remind friends that I was self-employed-not unemployed! And even if you are unemployed, it may be part of your daily ‘job’ to actively seek a job.

Devote the discipline, focus and time to do so. Endless hours on the phone complaining about things won’t help.

Focus and prioritise

If you need to concentrate on a big project, put your phone on silent in another room with a recorded message of when you’ll return calls. Obviously that won’t work for all occupations, but most of us don’t really need to be in response mode 24/7. 

Visible goals, purpose and outcomes

To avoid being easily distracted, have your important goals, outcomes and purpose clearly visible.

These will serve as a constant reminder that all tasks should contribute to those ends, and that it’s not necessary to reply to every email or read every article that comes across your virtual desk.

Daily to-do list

As well as the big picture plan, have a daily to-do list. Commit a certain number of hours per day to your key big goal and other tasks that require completion. Maybe three key things that must be done that day and five more you’d like to do.

Rather than chance it to memory, you’ll not only achieve more but have a sense of satisfaction as you tick things off.

Outsource

As much as possible, focus on your big goals and outsource more mundane tasks, those you don’t like doing or ones that others can do better than you. Think cleaning, database, bookkeeper accountant, IT specialist, virtual PA, et cetera.

Play to your strengths and get help with your weaknesses.

Batch tedious tasks and calls

For greater productivity, ask yourself: ‘What will be my best use of time today? Tomorrow? This week? This month?’

For example, I have a ‘finance Friday’ to handle all things financial, rather than deal with bills and invoices as they arrive.  

Deadlines

At business school, I vividly remember reading The Peter Principle, in which, among other things, author Laurence Peters postulates that most tasks expand to fill the available time. 

Nothing happens without a deadline; or very little does. As a writer and professional speaker, nothing focuses my mind and my work activity more sharply than a deadline from a publisher or approaching conference, when the luxury of creative thinking vanishes to give way to completion.

So, it’s necessary to set self-imposed deadlines for important tasks.

And by the way, there is never enough time for entrepreneurial thinking people to do all the things they’d like to do. 

Clear the clutter

It’s an old habit from my IBM career, because the company insisted on a clean desk policy before employees left the office. It’s served me well even when I’m the only person who might ever see that messy desk.

Messy desk equals messy mind, so my home workspace is clear at the end of each day (whenever the end of that day may be) with my to-do list ready for the next day to start afresh with a clean slate.  

Maintain high standards

Don’t let standards slip. OK, so there were times the laptop balanced on knees while I sat in my Qantas pyjamas. But avoid this. It’s easy to slip into the groove of hanging around the house like a total slob.

I know one person who walks around the block and back into his home office at 8.30am every morning, and another who still dons lipstick while home alone, even if they have no zoom calls that day. Do whatever works to help you work in this new environment. 

Personally, I’m looking for time delay lock on the fridge, but the best I can do is to physically shut the door to the home office and set a timer that I won’t even think of leaving the chair even a second before. Yes, more discipline.  

Practice a healthy lifestyle

People often ask me how I find time to exercise. It has always been an essential activity for me. It is not a waste of time and an integral part of my daily routine regardless of what work pressures may loom.

We can’t take care of our clients or family if we don’t take care of ourselves!

This may sound somewhat obsessive, but I actually have it at the top of my daily to-do list, and the mere fact of checking it off gives me a strange sense of achieving at least one of my goals for the day. 

I also have ‘stretch’ on my daily list as a reminder to occasionally give those shoulders and neck a break. 

Performance review

At the end of each day, have a 60-second review as you brush your teeth and honestly assess those last 24 hours.

We’re all prone to beat ourselves up for what we haven’t achieved because of some frustration (often a result of technology and/or bureaucracy glitches beyond our control).

Take the time to reflect, and possibly journal, all the things you have achieved and everything that you’re grateful for, even if it hasn’t been a perfect day.

Time out

While a focus on discipline is essential, sometimes we do indeed need to be a little gentler with ourselves.   

When enough is enough?

Admittedly, that’s a lesson I’m still working on, but most self-employed people and self-starters always have a steady stream of new ideas, which means their to-do list is never completely done.

So do take some time to smell the roses or appreciate that view.

Rewards

Apart from the obvious financial rewards of working productively from home, set your own rewards when you reach certain goals. It may be an annual dream vacation (when travel resumes), a monthly manicure (when that resumes), a weekly TV binge or a daily treat.

This article was originally published on SmartCompany. Reproduced with permission from the author.

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Posted in The world @work

WFH!? How to beat the bogeys on working from home…

For those of us who haven’t been regularly working from home (WFH) until now, the prospect can be a bit daunting. Whilst the nature of my job means I’m fortunate to be able to work effectively in a digital environment, I also like a bit of separation between my living room and the office. I’ve found WFH perfect for intense periods of concentration – planning, creating, writing pitches, proposals and reports. Collaborating on projects, getting feedback on drafts and quick decision-making? It’s often a lot easier in person.

As we move towards WFH in the longer term, I thought I’d share a few tips from my personal experience on how to beat some of the bogeys you encounter when working from home.

  1. Prepare first – Decide which tasks you will be working on and take home any hard copy files you cannot access electronically or material that is easier to work from in print. Test your internet connection and remote access via the company’s Citrix or VPN.
  2. Map out a schedule – Your WFH schedule may not be the same as your office hours. Give yourself a start and finish time, allowing for breaks. This helps manage the temptation to procrastinate or work until you drop.
  3. Present yourself – If you’re not face-timing customers or colleagues, it might be tempting to spend all day in your pyjamas. You will feel more motivated and it’s easier to slot into work zone, if you get up out of bed, have a shower and get dressed – business casual or not.
  4. Go to work in your home office – Whether it’s the kitchen table, a separate room or a study nook, clear a space, follow the WFS OHS protocols and go there to work. Leave it too, when you’re taking a break.
  5. Let others know you’re at work – Partners, flatmates, kids and pets… we love them, but they can be pests at times! Forewarn your household and try to work around their schedules to minimise the impact on each other as far as you can.
  6. Remove other distractions – Pausing your personal social media and other apps while you’re working is good professional practice whether WFH or in the office.
  7. Multitasking is a myth – It’s ok to put on a load of washing, but don’t get distracted by deep cleaning the house. A few chores while taking a break can help return your focus on work.
  8. Reward yourself – Go for a walk at lunchtime, get a proper coffee or food from a café. There are lots of activities you can fit into 30 minutes to an hour when your close to home.
  9. Check-in – Maintain your usual contact with colleagues via phone, email and other messaging or collaborating apps, and check-in with your team leader or manager on your progress through or at the end of day.

What works for you when you’re working from home?

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Posted in The world @work