Blog Archives

The Goldilocks of HR Advice

Not too small, not too big, just right.

It’s 3.00pm on a Friday and you’re asked, “What’s the policy on Social Media?” You realise you haven’t seen updated policies for over 12 months and you’re not sure your organisation has a Social Media Policy. Help!

No matter how big or how small an organisation, there are head-scratching HR issues you just wish you could talk through with someone.

At Slade Group, we’re no different. We have to stay close to all HR and labour legislation, Fair Work, Awards and all relevant rulings.  We’re not big enough to warrant a full-time in-house People and Culture leader, but we’re in an industry that has to be absolutely attuned to the world of Human Resources.   

This is our Secret Santa gift to you… HR Advice Online is like that product or service you didn’t know had been invented, and then when you find out about it you think, why didn’t I think of that!?

Your delight will be like ours when you discover there’s now a service where you can talk to a live qualified HR practitioner about all those things that would normally keep you up at night:

  • Which award, if any, are my employees covered by?
  • My business only has a small number of employees, so can I terminate an employee at any time?
  • Annual Leave Loading – we don’t need to pay that?
  • What do I need to have in place for employees working from home?
  • We pay above the Award, so therefore we’re not covered by the Award, right?

If you’d like to know more, let us know and we’ll put you in touch with the right people, or have a look at our HR Advice Online page under the Employer Services section on our website. 

Sweet dreams and a happy New Year!

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Posted in The world @work

How to job search during the holidays: Three options, depending on your availability.

There is no reason to stop job hunting during the Festive Season, Christmas, and New Year. You can if you want or need to. But if you have time on your hands, or if you are in a hurry to find your next job, then this is, in fact, a great opportunity to step ahead of the game and get an advantage.

Click here to listen to the podcast…

Other articles in the same series:

This article was first published on the The Job Hunting Podcast Blog.

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Posted in The world @work

Are your employees safe Working from Home?

Whilst it is generally accepted that many businesses made a rapid almost overnight transition to work from home at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, eight months on, are your employees safe?

With many employees moving to work from home arrangements initially working from makeshift work areas such as kitchen benches, couches and even lap tables in bed, what are you doing to ensure your employees have moved to more ergonomically suitable work specific areas to reduce their risk of injury or illness?

Flexible arrangements forced by the pandemic are becoming the new ‘normal’ for many workplaces with the realisation that technology, video conferencing and reduced travel time can result in a more productive and less expensive workplace however, these costs will increase greatly if employees are working from home without a suitable set up.

The Work Health and Safety obligations on an employer require that they provide a workplace that is free of risk to their employees so far as is reasonably practicable. As the home office is simply an extension to the workplace, an employer is obligated to ensure that the employee has a suitable work area, as they would be obligated to do so in the office location.

Musculoskeletal injuries caused by poor ergonomic work areas is an obvious risk when considering what injuries may occur in work from home settings. Other injuries and illnesses may include; social isolation from not working in a workplace with their colleagues; fatigue and burnout from not having a work area that they can walk away from forcing that work life balance; and stress caused by job uncertainty.

It is recommended that workplaces begin to return to a new COVID norm, that a reassessment of the flexible work arrangements be undertaken to include the actual workspace setups employees have and how they have coped working in that environment. 

Now is also the time to ensure you have well documented policies, procedures and employment documents which are imperative for clarity of expectations for employees who work remotely due to their lack of face to face contact.

To greater assist your employees with work from home and to minimise their risk you should:-

  • Update all work from home documentation including policies, procedures and checklists to ensure they are fit for purpose.
  • Clarify when a work from home employee is ‘at work’ and when it is their personal time.  Consideration could be given to even shutting off access for employees to systems indicating that they have finished for the day.
  • Talk to your employees regarding safety whilst working at home. Ensure they are aware that their obligation to keep themselves safe and to report any injury, incident or near miss continues to exist as the home is their extended workplace.
  • Investigate any incidents, injuries promptly to understand if they are a work related injury and to assist the employee to reduce or eliminate any future risk.

This article was originally published by HR Advice Online. For more information about our partnership, click here.

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Posted in The world @work

COVID-19 continues to change how we work. Could it be for the better?

Living in Australia and having experienced the Stage 4 lockdowns in Victoria, it is apparent that this pandemic has changed how we work. The question now is, could it be for the better?

Last month our team joined the SEEK Insight & Innovation 2020 digital event, a seminar which was informative and well executed.

Some of the ideas presented really stem from taking the time to be considerate of the massive upheaval experienced by many people across the world, and I am pleased to say Slade Group has been carrying them through: increasing employee engagement; adapting to new ways of working, primarily working from home (especially for those who are in roles that are not usually accustomed to working from home); investing in new technology; innovating our service delivery and diversifying our service offering.   

While at this stage ‘Covid Normal’ is still being defined, according to the statistics presented by SEEK, a massive 41% of people are rethinking their careers. The cycle of travelling to work, working long hours, travelling home, rushing the family meal, ferrying children to sports and other extra curricular activities, spending the whole weekend doing the same things… and then starting it all over again – isn’t appealing anymore.

Covid has given us the capacity to explore what we may be able to achieve without the usual routine we have just accepted as ‘life’, which statistics are saying isn’t desirable anymore.

It used to be cool to be ‘super busy’ because you were ‘successful’ and didn’t have time for anyone or anything. With the benefit of lockdown hindsight, we can recognise a few home truths: You may not be suited to the role you are doing, or you may have had too many roles (paid or unpaid) with too much on your plate. Were you making excuses not to catch up with someone you would really have liked to spend time with or to take time out for yourself?

With just over one month left in 2020, what are the insights for next year? I think most would agree taking care of our health is much higher on the agenda. Working from home in some capacity is here to stay. If your current role doesn’t provide the flexibility to reset the balance or you’ve had a break from the workforce and are looking to get your career back on track, what would be challenging and stimulating?

My team at Slade Group are assisting our client organisations to develop the culture and strategies that will allow them to be successful in a post Covid world @work. At the same time, we are helping candidates to reinvent themselves and find their perfect role, not simply because it’s our job, or to do our part to reduce the unemployment rate (since the pandemic, the highest in over 20 years) and rebuild the economy. We are looking forward to a new normal where personal life and business life happily coexist, so you may need to find another reason to not catch up with that person you have been putting off. 😊

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Posted in Technical & Operations, The world @work

How to start your Board Director career

To develop a non-executive director career requires time and planning. In this video, Renata Bernarde, career planning expert and creator of the online coaching program, Job Hunting Made Simple, talks with Marion Macleod FAICD, a non-executive director, board consultant, and trainer with over 25 years’ board experience. You can read Marion’s full bio on The Job Hunting Podcast here.

Click here to watch the video…

Other articles in the same series:

This article was first published on the The Job Hunting Podcast Blog.

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Observing or marking. Rather than celebrating. NAIDOC week as a non-indigenous Australian.

The story goes that a couple of well-meaning inner urbanites had a front door plaque that read “We are proud to acknowledge Aboriginal people as traditional owners of these lands and waters”. And when a couple of said Aboriginal people came knocking on the door to be welcomed home, the door was opened and then firmly shut on them. There was no happy ending for anyone in this story.

NAIDOC week is an important week in our calendar, celebratory for many, and for Indigenous culture. But it’s also an awkward week for non-indigenous Australians, uncomfortable truths, uncertainty navigating what is respectful and celebratory, and what is paternalist and privileged. I feel it personally in the small and large things in daily life; we have a flag pole at our place, and yet I’m not sure what the protocol is about flying the Indigenous flag this week when I’m not Indigenous. I want to show my heartfelt support for the First Nations people of Australia but I’m unclear whether that’s ok, and if it’s seen as lip service.  

I’m learning, but too slowly and I’m not always sure of what resources are available to steer my understanding and insights.

In recent years I’ve made the mistake of saying in a public forum
“Welcome to Country” when only Traditional Owners/Custodians of the land on which the event takes place can deliver a Welcome to Country. It’s not a mistake I’ll ever make again; if a Traditional Owner is not available to do a Welcome to Country, an Acknowledgement of Country can be delivered instead.

I currently have no colleagues who identify as ATSI (Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander), Indigenous or First Nations, and yet all the while I’ve been working on a number of Indigenous related projects this year. Why am I working on these and not with someone with Indigenous heritage?  Should we all be trying harder to address this lack of diversity? But here’s the rub. Only 3% of all Australian’s identify as Indigenous, and the most recent ABS statistics from 2016 show the spread of our Indigenous country men and women doesn’t always correlate with meeting diversity targets.

Estimated resident population, Indigenous status, 30 June 2016

  Aboriginal only Torres Strait Islander only Both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Total Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Non-Indigenous Total
  no. no. no. no. no. no.
NSW 254,842 5,888 4,955 265,685 7,467,173 7,732,858
VIC 54,044 2,350 1,373 57,767 6,115,405 6,173,172
QLD 176,910 24,873 19,493 221,276 4,623,876 4,845,152
SA 40,393 1,115 757 42,265 1,670,578 1,712,843
WA 96,497 1,882 2,133 100,512 2,455,466 2,555,978
TAS 26,152 1,322 1,063 28,537 488,977 517,514
NT 71,288 1,020 2,238 74,546 171,132 245,678
ACT 7,113 196 204 7,513 395,591 403,104
AUS 727,485 38,660 32,220798,36523,392,54224,190,907

Estimated resident Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, Remoteness Areas, 30 June 2016

  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Non-Indigenous Total
Remoteness Areas % % %
Major Cities 37.4 72.7 71.6
Inner Regional 23.7 17.8 18.0
Outer Regional 20.3 8.0 8.4
Remote 6.7 1.0 1.2
Very Remote 11.9 0.5 0.8

indigenous.gov.au

Having a job helps people build the future they want for their families and their communities.

Supporting people to find and stay in work and making sure everyone has the opportunity to own your own home, run your own business, and provide for yourself and your families will mean a strong future for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

To make this happen, government and communities need to work together to:

  • increase the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have work
  • train more people for local jobs in their communities
  • support Indigenous rangers to manage land and sea country
  • progress land and Native Title claims
  • negotiate more community held township leases.

The Government works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, to help you build your future your way. Different communities will have different priorities and different ways they want to develop and sustain economic independence in their region.

Many of these events are linked to this year’s theme, Always Was, Always Will Be. The theme recognises that First Nations people have occupied and cared for this continent for over 65,000 years and their spiritual and cultural connection to Country. This has heightened my awareness and understanding of the challenges and opportunities to First Nations people.

The government introduced the Indigenous Procurement Policy (IPP) on 1 July 2015 to give Indigenous businesses greater opportunity at winning Commonwealth contracts. The IPP leverages the Commonwealth’s annual multi-billion procurement spend to drive demand for Indigenous goods and services, stimulate Indigenous economic development and grow the Indigenous business sector. For more information refer to Indigenous Procurement Policy.

Links

www.iworkjobsite.com.au

iWork is now Australia’s leading Indigenous jobs board with over 5,000 Indigenous people registered for direct work opportunities

https://www.indigenous.gov.au/news-and-media/announcements/grants-deliver-scholarship-program-call-applications

https://www.indigenous.gov.au/news-and-media/announcements/indigenous-business-month-2020-award-winners

https://www.indigenous.gov.au/news-and-media/announcements/indigenous-apprenticeships-program-0www.supplynation.com 

Supply Nation provides Australia’s leading database of verified Indigenous businesses which can be searched by business name, product, service, area, or category.

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Has COVID-19 derailed your career?

Renata Bernarde interviews Geoff Slade for The Job Hunting Podcast

Renata Bernarde, career planning expert and creator of the online coaching program, Job Hunting Made Simple, talks to Geoff Slade about how the global pandemic is affecting the careers of corporate professionals. Geoff shares what he has seen and learned from previous downturns, common misunderstandings about the selection process and the role of the recruiter, and highlights the importance of ongoing training and networking.

Click here to watch the video…

Other episodes in the same series:


Has COVID-19 derailed your career?

We invite you to a webinar that Slade Group are presenting on Tuesday 27 October 2020 for those candidates we have had involvement with over the past couple of years, and whose career may have been affected by COVID-19, or who simply would like to re-set their career ambitions.

The webinar, which runs from 9am to 1pm, will be hosted by Renata Bernarde, the creator of the Job Hunting Made Simple educational program, and widely regarded as “the expert” in providing advice on job hunting in Australia. Renata will be supported on the day (remember it’s October 27th) by Slade Group’s Executive team.

In recognition of the fact that many people have been displaced during this pandemic, Slade Group have negotiated a special arrangement with Renata, reducing the cost of the webinar by more than 30% using the discount code SLADE2020 when booking . If you are interested, we do highly recommend it to you and you should find it will give you some very practical, and useable techniques if you are searching for a new career opportunity.

Click here for full details…

We look forward to seeing you there!

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Video meetings and interviews – Tips and Tricks!

There’s no doubt that a video interview has become an acceptable step in the hiring process. It has proven positive results, as well as delivering tangible time and cost savings for all involved. So whilst we’re anticipating a return to Real Life interviews, candidates are advised to master the virtual interviews – they’re here to stay.

For candidates preparing for TZ (Teams/Zoom) interviewing, we’re sharing some insiders’ tips to ensure the unfamiliar becomes familiar and less unnerving.

Here’s a pocket guide to online interviews and meetings.

The key is preparation.

AS ALWAYS: Do your research on the company, gather information on its history, culture, key employees and recent performance. Prepare 2-3 questions you can ask at the end of the interview. Is it about to embark on major growth and expansion? What is their policy regarding flexible working arrangements? This will demonstrate your interest in the job and that you have done your due diligence.

Before the interview identify the activities and accomplishments in your background that would demonstrate you are the most qualified candidate for the position.

SET UP: Establish a space where you are facing an open window or light. Ideally, that means your computer screen sits between you and the source of light. In this way your face will be well lit and you won’t be a dark shape against a strong backdrop of light.

Make sure your are seated, or standing in such a way that your face is well centred on the screen and your screen isn’t pointing up to the ceiling, but rather projects a line of sight parallel with the floor.

As with all meetings maintaining eye contact is essential to ensure you are engaging with your audience and especially if this a job interview. Nothing is more distracting than to be constantly looking down at your notes. One solution is to place post it notes around the perimeter of your screen or immediately behind it. These should be key points not a script; if you have done your homework these act as prompts.

DRESS: Dress appropriately for the role as if you were going to a physical interview and check the background behind you.

LISTEN: Listen carefully to the questions, you want to be able to address questions succinctly and clearly; if it is not clear, ask for clarification to ensure you are providing the information required. Nothing is more off putting than a rambling answer. If it takes you more than two minutes, you have probably gone off script!

THE MUTE BUTTON: Don’t panic, we all do it, but make sure you ask people to repeat themselves if you didn’t hear them, or be comfortable to repeat yourself if you forgot to unmute or you have a poor connection.

FOLLOW UP: On completing the interview email your thanks and ongoing interest in the position; this will most likely ensure you stand out from other candidates.

Finally and most importantly, breathe!

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