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Your recruiter is a tool

Well, I don’t mean tool in the pejorative! A well forged, fit for purpose tool is a valued accessory. Would you attempt a home renovation with just a hammer? In the job search process, savvy candidates realise recruiters are part of the solution – a tool in their kit rather than their sole strategy to market. Having placed many executives in senior roles over the years, people often ask me what more they could do to improve their prospects for selection. Here are five strategies to consider:

  1. Leverage your networks

It’s easy to underestimate the breadth of your own individual networks, but candidates who take the time to analyse their contacts (which may include previous colleagues and managers, university contacts, neighbours, social networks, etc.) find them a valuable source of information. Whether it’s a new opening or general market information, your chances of obtaining a position improve when you’re already recognised in your industry. For a prospective employer, it’s also less risky to hire someone who is known to be a strong performer.

  1. Select your recruitment partners carefully

While it might be tempting to send your resume to every search firm, be selective about the organisations with whom you’re entrusting confidentiality, particularly if you’re currently employed. Think about the exclusivity of your application rather than applying with every recruiter. Consultants strive to represent unique candidates who have not been overexposed and will proactively market them to our clients. Make sure that’s you.

  1. Take the lead on your job search and partner with your recruiter to bridge any gaps in your networks

Ideally a recruiter should complement, not replace, your job search activity. Manage your applications carefully and partner with recruiters who can present you to companies where you don’t have existing contacts or an established network.

  1. Cull what’s not working

Evaluate your job search progress on a regular basis and refine or ditch any strategies that aren’t working. This includes analysing the performance of your recruitment partner. If they said that they were going to market you to a particular company, ask for a progress report. If you think that they’re not delivering, then re-evaluate whether they are best suited to help you.

  1. Customise your resume

One mistake I often observe is that candidates will customise their covering letter, but fail to adjust their resume accordingly. Review your resume and consider tailoring it to suit each opportunity. The changes could be as simple as emphasising your most relevant experience by reordering your achievements.

If your perception of recruiters in general has been negative to date, try adjusting your engagement strategy by following my advice. I’m confident you’ll get results and be successful.

What advice do you have for executive candidates?

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Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work

How to triage CV applications in the War for Talent

In his own way, the great Napoleonic surgeon Dominique Larrey has influenced the progress of your career! Over 200 years ago he halted the practice of treating ranked officers ahead of foot soldiers, and instead introduced the modern rule of triage of casualties; that is treating the wounded according to their level of injury and urgency for medical care. We’re saluting a long departed hero of another time and in a very different field, but whose legacy also affects us all. Read on and join the dots.

“Dominique Larrey knew that those with critical injuries would stand a good chance of survival if they were operated on within the first hour of their trauma occurring. Those with minor injuries were made to wait, while the more seriously injured were attended to. Those deemed to be mortally wounded were put aside, often with alcohol to comfort them until they passed away, whilst resources were concentrated on those who could survive.

This process of systematic evaluation became known as ‘triage’, a French word meaning ‘to sort’.

No one dared to question Larrey’s triage system for fear of being deemed aristocratic  – a status that would almost certainly attract the attention of the dreaded Committee of Public Safety, the ruling council in Paris.”

Recruiters have to be adroit ‘sorters’ of CVs and we’ve taken a few tips from Larrey. It sounds harsh that sometimes the hours you’ve put into preparing a CV can be scanned and assessed in all of 10 seconds by a recruiter. But that is the task and fortunately we’ve moved well beyond previous prejudices that were blinkered by creed, culture and colour, the Queen’s English and postcodes.

So what is that we’re looking for in terms of (i) ‘Not for this job’, (ii) ‘Maybe for this job’ and (iii) ‘Yes, I want to meet’?

Every role is different, but here are some of the 10 fast-as-lightening assessments that have to be made in ‘the War for Talent’.

Triage Language: Won’t Survive.  Slade Group: Not for this job

 

  • Too many moves
    Once you’ve grown through your 20s, we’re looking for ‘stickability’. If you’re ‘out looking’ every one to two years in your 30s and 40s, then sadly your career is heading for the morgue.

 

 

  • Failed English
    If you can’t spell, then use spellcheck, and if you can’t draw together a reasonable sentence, then getting ahead is going to be hard.

 

 

  • Completely irrelevant experience or skill set
    Don’t waste our time.

 

Triage Language: Serious Injuries.  Slade Group: Needs more time to assess

 

  • Some relevant experience
    Interesting related experience; might not have worked in the same sector or similar role but has related experience that could add real value.

 

 

  • A succinct career statement
    Makes it enticing to invest more time to understand what this candidate could bring to an organisation.

 

 

  • Relevant qualifications
    A technical role often requires relevant qualifications; think accounting, engineering, the law, medicine and IT. Not always the case, but often the case.

 

 

  • Concise and easy to read
    This simple tip puts yours ahead of CVs that have to be read twice, that are filled with paragraphs and lengthy narrative.

 

Triage Language: Minor Injuries.  Slade Group: Almost perfect, get them in for interview

 

  • Achievements
    A CV with real cache will highlight respected career achievements to excite a recruiter and your next employer.

 

 

  • Career Trajectory
    Several internal promotions at a number of long stay roles, and/or successive, successful career steps will shape a blue chip CV.

 

 

  • Blue chip qualifications, employers and documented achievements
    Hard to beat the trifecta.

 

If you haven’t been getting to interview, perhaps review the roles you’re applying for and check in with your own CV to make sure it’s not working against you.

That’s our world @work on this our 100th Blog. What’s your point of view?

Please keep up the feedback, comments and input.

Featured image: Wounded arriving at triage station, National Museum of Health and MedicineCreative Commons licence

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Posted in The world @work

Peering over that hill: Tips for mature workers

While ‘job for life’ opportunities do still exist, the reality is that most of us will change roles frequently throughout our working life. For people who are seeking a new role either by choice or necessity and who are in the twilight of their careers, the prospect of looking for a job can be stressful and challenging.

Without a doubt, the mature worker brings a host of capabilities and with a gap of nearly 50 years between the oldest and youngest workers in some organisations, these individuals are in a unique position to add value and mentor both directly and indirectly, bringing knowledge that only time and experience can provide.

If you’re facing the potential of a late change in your career, here are some tips to remind you exactly how much you bring to the (work) table:

  1. Employers are looking for results, not years. Talk about your achievements, identifying the benefits of having you as part of the company. No matter how small, draw attention to the great things you’ve done.
  2. Maturity isn’t something to apologise for! Celebrate the experience, resilience and stability that have come with time that younger workers aren’t able to demonstrate.
  3. Your experience may be intimidating to hiring managers with less tenure or experience, but with a little discretion and guidance, you can add value to help them fast track their own careers.
  4. Significant work on long-term projects or development over a series of shorter-term assignments provides further evidence of commitment to achieving outcomes. Sell yourself on ROI, highlighting your successful accomplishments by backing them up with cost-benefit facts.
  5. The likelihood of you needing time off for all of the usual life events is greatly reduced; you’re more reliable, dependable and you won’t let people down.
  6. It stands to reason that you have a great work ethic – more and more that isn’t a given and it makes you highly desirable to employers.
  7. You didn’t start texting until you had already learned how to spell. This is a huge advantage for professional correspondence. It’s likely that you will know the difference between there, their and they’re.

Be proud, keep reminding yourself that you’re experienced, maturity adds value and that makes you fabulous.

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Posted in Professional Support, The world @work