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How Technical & Operations professionals in the Property & Construction industry are influencing the Australian economy.

Continuing our series of boardroom luncheon events with influential people in Technical & Operations, Slade Group recently hosted Kate Bailey, Associate Director – Head of Logistics and Retail Research at CBRE.

Focusing the conversation on how the Australian economy will perform in 2019 and beyond, we discussed the impact of e-commerce on the industrial property market, looked at how increasing vacancies and slowing retail sales impact the retail sector, and considered infrastructure challenges in the face of fast delivery.

Kate had some interesting statistics about how our online shopping habits have contributed to land fill. For example, I didn’t know that 30% of all goods sold online are returned, with a staggering 2billion kg in the US going to landfill waste annually. While many retailers no longer build their businesses with bricks and mortar, the space required for warehousing goods bought online is having a significant impact on urban planning. With parcel delivery now their major activity, services like Australia Post have had to completely change their business model. Yet it’s still often cheaper to purchase a book from Amazon, which is shipped from the other side of the world, than to buy the same item from local bookshop. Kate says 30% of customers will pay more just for faster delivery.

Kate highlighted that omni-channel shoppers, those who buy online as well as in physical retail stores, typically spend up to 30% more than traditional shoppers. Sneakerboy in Melbourne is an example of how an innovative business has successfully integrated the concept of omni-channel retail. Its Flinders Lane store has 96% floor space for maximum storefront efficiency – they only stock a single pair of shoes in each size. Customers try on the shoes then purchase via an iPad in store. The shoes are shipped directly to the customer from Hong Kong.

Convenience is becoming more and more a part of the building design of both commercial and residential buildings. We’re starting to see features like hot food vending machines for time poor (couldn’t-be-bothered-cooking) professionals on the go. Driverless cars, soon to be a reality, are further evidence of convenience led product development, but what will happen to the existing infrastructure?

We had a great chat around the table, with everyone from retail, construction, land development, engineering, architecture, interior design and those of us involved in the recruitment of these industry professionals, contributing to the discussion.

Continue the conversation by posting a comment on this blog or feel free to send through a question for me to refer on to Kate. If you would like to be a facilitator at one of our quarterly boardroom lunches please contact me directly, details below.

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Posted in Technical & Operations, The world @work

Experience – your gift to give.

A couple of times lately, younger professional women have come to seek my advice on some situations they’ve found themselves in in their work life… Anything from discussing appropriate work wear, or how to handle a tough conversation with a client or colleague, correct ways to entertain clients and how to be confident. And believe it or not, just plain feeling comfortable ‘being themselves’ in a business setting rather than ‘being an exemplar businesswoman’.

It got me thinking about the times when I went to my more experienced peers seeking advice (and I still do), and the positive impact of those conversations on me and how they shaped my career decisions.

The truth is, I feel really honoured to be a person that other women trust. Whether it’s to discuss a situation and seek my advice (somewhere along the track I may have experienced something similar or I am familiar with the circumstances) or to see how I would handle a situation. I help them make up their own mind about how to tackle it, and in most instances they just need a sounding board.

Experience in business, and the confidence that you gain as you encounter different situations, comes with time. Dealing with those difficult meetings, standing your ground on a decision, knowing when to negotiate and even knowing when to walk away from a deal, all come with time.

As a recruiter, I see many candidates who are starting out in their career and have aspirations of taking over the world – their enthusiasm for their work is palpable!  It’s something I find quite inspiring and probably something that makes me enjoy working with people daily.

I think those of us with experiences over time have a responsibility to guide and mentor others who are starting their professional life or making a change in their career. When the going gets tough and someone less experienced doesn’t know how to handle a situation, it’s up to us to listen. We should take time out to talk with them about how to handle that situation, so that once resolved, they can add it to their collection of experiences, to one day pass on with their experience gained with time.

Are you part of a mentoring program or have you benefited from being mentored at any stage of your career? What advice would you give to other professionals who are just starting out or are new to the industry in your world @work?

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Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work

Call out for a call back!

Something I learned a number of years ago… always follow through with what you say you are going to do in business. Close out the deal, finish the process, you get the drift. If you say you are going to do something, then do it. If something is going to stop you from delivering on your promise, then face up to it, and come up with a solution.

In recruitment, sometimes we hear people say that recruiters don’t call them back when they have applied for a job. I understand this happens, and I’d like to think our processes are strong enough at Slade Group, that it is not a frequent occurrence with our candidates.

Whether it be an email to say that, unfortunately, you have been unsuccessful with your online application or a phone call to provide feedback after you have interviewed with a prospective employer, it’s the least we can do to be honest with candidates. It’s also the least we want to give – we often provide career advice, referrals to other employment opportunities and build lasting relationships with candidates who in turn become clients over the years. Slade Group is also an ISO 9001 Quality Accredited executive recruitment firm, our reputation with our customers (both clients and candidates) is on the line, so we really do want to get back to you.

For good measure, I always ask every candidate I have met to ensure that they keep in touch with me as well, within a timeframe we have agreed.

It makes sense in business (in fact any relationship) that you’re likely to be more successful if you endeavour to build rapport with the people you are dealing with. For a candidate, the recruitment process typically means taking a big step in their career. For the organisations we represent, there is an element of risk to taking on a new employee and we do our utmost to ensure the candidate we refer is the right fit.

So it’s a little puzzling when, well into negotiations with a candidate, I have put forward a great offer from the company I am representing and then there is… silence, crickets! You begin to wonder what has happened?

Giving the elusive candidate the benefit of the doubt (maybe they are sick or maybe they are caught up in a meeting?) it’s OK to excuse a couple of hours. However, if the candidate is a person who is usually on top of returning calls it can certainly be disconcerting.

Recruitment can be like dating, sitting around waiting for someone to call you… after a while you get the drift, and you know they aren’t going to call. You have most likely experienced it or may have even done it yourself. (Why don’t they call???)

If you are dealing with a recruiter who has put you forward for a role and being a highly sought after talented individual, you receive an offer, I encourage you to act with integrity and finish the process. Talk to your consultant about why you have reservations about taking the role. A good recruiter will listen, see if there is something they can do to help, and if not you can still walk away. Leave a good impression, be professional, finish the process. Regardless of the outcome. It’s polite, courteous and the very least you could do.

 

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Posted in Technical & Operations, The world @work