Blog Archives

The fly on the wall

So you’ve made it to the interview stage and you’re one step closer to getting the job. But did you realise that sometimes an assessment begins the moment you walk through the front door?

Welcome to our office. I’m the receptionist. The friendly face who will greet you, make you comfortable while you wait for your appointment, and introduce you to your consultant.

Most people think the job interview itself is the deal-breaker. Certainly it’s a key factor in the selection process. But in my experience making a stand-out impression doesn’t just begin when you sit down with an interviewer.

Over the past five years as a receptionist in the recruitment industry, I’ve often found that our consultants want to meet candidates who have the right skill set, experience and look like the right cultural fit.

You’ve dressed to impress (because first impressions do count), arrived ahead of time and dealt with the paperwork.

Now there’s a few minutes before your appointment. Sit tight and resist the temptation to stick your chewing gum to underside of our coffee table. You’d be horrified by what we discovered when moving offices in the past.

Shortly I will walk with you from the front desk to the interview room and in that time, get to know a little about your personality before handing over to your consultant. At this point, check in with yourself: ‘Is she just the receptionist?’

Showing all the brilliant sides that make you ‘the best’ for 30 minutes to an hour is easy. But sometimes I’ve seen candidates let their real ‘me’ out of the bag once an interview is over.  After you’ve interviewed, a shorter interview takes place. Consultant’s check-in with me. How did you interact with the receptionist?

Practice your perfect pitch again on the way out. Eyes are still watching you. Elevator walls have ears too.

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Posted in The world @work

Playing from a 10.

It’s no secret Australians love mobile technology. Gizmodo reports over 97% now own smart phones. But we often forget we’re carrying the most sophisticated mobile tech of all above our neck. Using your mind in business sounds like a no-brainer, so it’s surprising to learn that our ‘necktop computers’ are often the least used.

I recently attended a networking luncheon at RogenSi, an international communications consultancy, best known for assisting the Australian Olympic Committee to successfully win the Sydney 2000 Olympics. Having the confidence to bid for an Olympic Games may be beyond the reach of most, but RogenSi Melbourne Director, James Cumming, makes an interesting point. He links confidence to attitude, a mindset for success. James calls it “Playing from a 10”.

According to James, this is what you need to do to prepare for your next business meeting, job interview or a sporting match, to get yourself in the right state of mind to be the most confident you can be: Imagine yourself at a 10. This is where you’re switched on, on the ball, bulletproof, pumped and ready to take on the world!  In this state of mind you’re going to do your best work. You’re going to give it your best shot.

Those times you’re feeling flat, disinterested, lazy, or uninspired? You’re not playing at your best, you’re playing from a 1. It’s an unproductive state of mind.

The numbers make sense to me. Of course in the real world, we can’t always be a perfect 10, but let me share a few tips from James to help bring you closer to 10 than 1.

  1. Your mind’s a ‘video vault’. To access your video memory bank, think about your past successes. That could be a great interview, a positive meeting or a sales pitch that went well in the past. Replay your mind’s video, remembering how you felt engaged at the time. Accessing that confident feeling from your mind’s video library brings it to your present. World champion athletes have been using visualisation for years. It’s a trick of the mind, and it works.
  1. Think about your non-verbal communication – the way you are using your voice, your body language, your facial expressions. Engage all of these non-verbals when speaking and you’ll present with confidence, passion and be in the right state of mind, whether it’s a business or personal conversation.
  1. Don’t forget your necktop computer. It’s better than any phone, tablet or watch.

I’ve tried these techniques myself and they really work. Don’t be afraid to try them yourself. Before your next business appointment, a job interview or a footy match, make sure your necktop computer is plugged in, turned on and you’ll be playing from a 10!

What techniques have you found useful to be confident in your business and personal dealings? What puts you in a productive, resourceful mindset?

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Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work