Blog Archives

A brand new box on the org structure

In a global survey of 500+ business leaders conducted by IIC Partners, three out of four respondents (76 percent) said they didn’t have a Chief Digital Officer (CDO). While a majority of organisations might not have a CDO, it’s becoming critical for businesses of all sizes to consider digital when recruiting any leadership roles.

Digital transformation began long ago in the corporate sector and has an even longer lead in industrial environments – just consider the history of robotics in manufacturing (circa 1955) or computer assisted design and engineering (1970s). Driven by PC, communications and database technologies, digital has successfully worked its way up the chain from IT to the back office, through administration to the front of house, via marketing.

Slade Executive is recruiting senior executives in digital right now, and we’re seeing an international trend in key digital appointments as part of the overall organisational strategy. Charting digital alongside traditional C suite roles, such as finance, operations and human resources, recognises its strategic importance. Along with information and marketing, we’ve seen that digital has the capacity to radically influence the competitiveness of an organisation in the present climate and will no doubt be essential to the survival of many industries in future.

In smaller businesses or those with more modest resources, a cross functional hybrid is the model for CDO. Agile executives who can work across a combination of digital, marketing and information technology are already highly sought after. As industry background becomes less relevant and a diverse CV looks more appealing, digital acumen is now one of the most commonly requested attributes when hiring leaders.

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When filling a CEO position seems like a call out to Mars

How do you find a CEO to head up a privately owned organisation, operating from a remote part of a former Eastern Bloc country, where there is no local entity, no information about the organisation in English and the Directors and the Owners do not speak your language?

For a TRANSEARCH consultant, it’s another exciting opportunity. In fact, early in the process we had to retain a local linguist with technical and sector knowledge to ensure we communicated effectively.

Here are my 6 Top Strategies for securing an executive for a parent company from a rare region:

Have respect for the client’s homegrown reputation, differing work practices and local regulatory standards.

Cultural and language barriers are sometimes the least of a client’s challenges: when they start mapping out audacious targets for their new hire, take time to allow them a reality check as you start sharing the local market realities.

Global accreditations and reputation is one thing, but building a local presence and distribution for products or services is another. As you’re learning about their region, help them understand a little about yours. In this case my client, a major international player with just over 50% market share in the sector in their own country, was seeking to expand their business in the Asia Pacific region. With a strong presence in Europe, they had recently launched in North America and were looking for a base in Sydney or Melbourne. Locally they would be up against established competitors with sizeable market shares.

Set realistic time frames. In this instance, searching the APAC region for a CEO with demonstrable startup experience in sectors supplying specialist FMCG products through omnichannel distribution routes was never going to be a simple task.

Attention to detail and high levels of candidate care will ultimately pay off.

Risk management is always a high priority in executive appointments and the new executive will need further support through the onboarding period and building their local team post hire.

Complicated by communication difficulties, I was fortunate that a few of our client’s senior executives had an intermediate level of English and a translator was available for our discussions. Over the course of my research for the assignment, I developed a deep understanding of the client, their business and its culture. On a broader scale, I was immersed in the business culture of another country, learning firsthand about how it thinks, works, behaves professionally and measures success.

Following this appointment, we continue to meet with the client and the CEO; I am pleased to hear their market entry initiatives are going well. We are already discussing the next mandate!

Have you procured goods or services internationally, provided or sought professional services across language and cultural boundaries or supplied emerging export markets? What are some of the challenges you experience in conducting international business in the not so obvious global markets?

This article was originally published on TRANSEARCH Executive Leadership Insights.

Republished with kind permission from TRANSEARCH International Australia.

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Posted in The world @work

What do a Greek coffee in the morning and an executive search consultant have in common?

It sounds like a conversation to be had over breakfast in the Mediterranean, but it actually took place on one of the chilliest Melbourne mornings in recent months, when I was invited as a guest on the 3XY Radio Hellas Proinos Kafes program (that’s Morning Coffee in Greek).

During the segment I spoke with hosts Tom Andronas and Alex Ninis about my role as Managing Director of TRANSEARCH International Australia, or chief amongst headhunters, as they like to call it.

If you’re wondering about the connection, it’s through my association with the Hellenic Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (HACCI), a professional network I’ve been involved with for some years.

Click the audio player below to listen to the interview.

If you’d like to hear the full program, it’s available here on the HACCI Soundcloud: Proinos Kafes podcast – 26 May 2015 – Bill Sakellaris (holidays to Greece are at your own expense).

Main image: Greek Coffee by Constadinos Vito on Flickr

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