Blog Archives

The Great Resignation is Coming (and an invitation to you)

Australian businesses, brace yourselves. According to all the data coming out of the USA (a trend very likely to be followed here in the first half of next year), almost half the workforce are gearing up for the sort of change we have never witnessed before… the ‘Great Resignation’ is coming!

Looking at the latest McKinsey Quarterly report “more than 15 million US workers have quit their jobs and counting, since April last year” and many are unlikely to return, as the pandemic brings about a new realisation of what is really important in their lives.

When this is combined with the fact that most employers don’t really understand why their people are planning to resign or leaving in the first place, it adds up to a talent shortage like we have never seen before.

The research tells us that employees are tired and many are grieving, most of them are seeking a renewed sense of purpose, and a need to feel valued by their employers. In other words, employers have to connect with the “hearts and minds” of their employees – not just treat them as expendable or transactional. Those that fail to do so, will find themselves on the wrong end of this great resignation in my view.

If companies don’t make a concerted effort to better understand why employees are leaving, and take meaningful action to retain them (and no, it’s not just about money), then I’m afraid they will be the big losers.

It doesn’t have to be this way though, and much will depend on the quality of management in most companies. Those who recognise the problem and do something about fixing it, have a unique opportunity to gain an edge in the race to attract, develop, and retain the talent they need in order to thrive.

I recently had the privilege of listening to a couple of extraordinary Australian Leadership Consultants: Michelle Rushton from People of Influence, and Anthony Sork of SORK HC, both of whom had interesting points of view,  somewhat different but overlapping, and in my opinion, provided very sound advice on life and leadership post pandemic.

Michelle talked about how all of us have the opportunity to lift ourselves into a leadership role within our organisations, whether that is formally recognised or not, and how that adds enjoyment and interest to the job you do, as well as to the company.

Anthony focussed on how employers need to create an attachment to their staff – by building trust, value, acceptance, and a feeling of belonging – and how these perceptions are influenced by their direct managers.

We at Slade Group and TRANSEARCH Australia have invited both Michelle Rushton and Anthony Sork to speak to our own staff, and our clients, as part of our Breakfast Zoom series of HR webinars. If you are interested in attending, please call Fiona Lewis-Gray on 03 9235 5116 to register your interest. 

Event dates:

Michelle Rushton
Thursday, 28 October 2021
8.00am – 9.30am
Online via Zoom

Anthony Sork
Thursday, 25 November 2021
8.00am – 9.30am
Online via Zoom

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Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work

EVP now means a partnership, with flexibility and the opportunity to contribute to a bigger picture

We’ve moved on from the Employee Value Proposition (EVP). Certainly a great working environment, progressive organisation culture, and the right level of remuneration with associated benefits are attractive to highly talented individuals. However, more and more I am seeing both organisations and candidates searching for the ultimate partnership between employer and employee.

Organisations want talent who can deliver, no matter what the situation. At executive level, there’s an expectation of availability (or at least to be contactable) 24/7, no matter what time zone and what time of the year… my New Year’s Eve phone calls are still ringing in my ears! Top performers are keen to have greater flexibility and accountability, including the hours, locations, scope of work and the projects they have the opportunity to work on. Working together embraces all of these ideals and both parties have a critical responsibility to adapt their approach to work in today’s marketplace.

Increasingly our life is more about want-want-want – just ask my teenage kids who want more than I can provide! As a consumer society, we often lose focus on the importance of empathy, compassion and giving. Nevertheless I believe we all want something that we can connect with, whether that be emotional, spiritual, financial or another reason. Going to work every day for a higher purpose is fulfilling. I am literally hearing from candidates the need to work in an environment where “I know I can make a difference”. To facilitate this, you must have an environment that places the bigger picture at the heart of its purpose, right?

Last year Salesforce was awarded the highest honour of #1 Best Place to Work in Australia. It’s worth asking, what do they do differently? The company adopts the Hawaiian spirit of Ohana (meaning ‘family’), which obviously resonates if you’ve ever met someone that works there or read some of their employee testimonials. Along with their 1-1-1 Corporate Philanthropy Model, where 1% of tech staff are allocated to supporting not-for-profit enterprises in Australia, Salesforce has also taken a stand on social issues, including gender equality and marriage equality.

Let’s not forget that understanding the customer is also paramount. We should aspire to achieve great partnerships with our clients, as well as our colleagues and our employer. Observing an organisation who values both the needs of customers and its own people will attract like-minded talent who are also a good cultural fit. Makes sense, doesn’t it?

If you’re a candidate, don’t be afraid to put yourself out there on what your real EVP looks like (I’m hinting it’s probably not a slide in the office). Employers, give and you shall receive in spades.

What’s unique about your value proposition as a candidate or an employer? How has your organisation adapted to these changing dynamics in the world @work?

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Posted in Consumer, Sport & Entertainment, The world @work