Blog Archives

EVP now means a partnership, with flexibility and the opportunity to contribute to a bigger picture

We’ve moved on from the Employee Value Proposition (EVP). Certainly a great working environment, progressive organisation culture, and the right level of remuneration with associated benefits are attractive to highly talented individuals. However, more and more I am seeing both organisations and candidates searching for the ultimate partnership between employer and employee.

Organisations want talent who can deliver, no matter what the situation. At executive level, there’s an expectation of availability (or at least to be contactable) 24/7, no matter what time zone and what time of the year… my New Year’s Eve phone calls are still ringing in my ears! Top performers are keen to have greater flexibility and accountability, including the hours, locations, scope of work and the projects they have the opportunity to work on. Working together embraces all of these ideals and both parties have a critical responsibility to adapt their approach to work in today’s marketplace.

Increasingly our life is more about want-want-want – just ask my teenage kids who want more than I can provide! As a consumer society, we often lose focus on the importance of empathy, compassion and giving. Nevertheless I believe we all want something that we can connect with, whether that be emotional, spiritual, financial or another reason. Going to work every day for a higher purpose is fulfilling. I am literally hearing from candidates the need to work in an environment where “I know I can make a difference”. To facilitate this, you must have an environment that places the bigger picture at the heart of its purpose, right?

Last year Salesforce was awarded the highest honour of #1 Best Place to Work in Australia. It’s worth asking, what do they do differently? The company adopts the Hawaiian spirit of Ohana (meaning ‘family’), which obviously resonates if you’ve ever met someone that works there or read some of their employee testimonials. Along with their 1-1-1 Corporate Philanthropy Model, where 1% of tech staff are allocated to supporting not-for-profit enterprises in Australia, Salesforce has also taken a stand on social issues, including gender equality and marriage equality.

Let’s not forget that understanding the customer is also paramount. We should aspire to achieve great partnerships with our clients, as well as our colleagues and our employer. Observing an organisation who values both the needs of customers and its own people will attract like-minded talent who are also a good cultural fit. Makes sense, doesn’t it?

If you’re a candidate, don’t be afraid to put yourself out there on what your real EVP looks like (I’m hinting it’s probably not a slide in the office). Employers, give and you shall receive in spades.

What’s unique about your value proposition as a candidate or an employer? How has your organisation adapted to these changing dynamics in the world @work?

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Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work

Why corporates should take leadership on social issues

One of the top international accounting firms hosts a networking event to facilitate a graduate mentoring program that supports aspiring LGBTI business professionals. The world’s strongest global law firm brand facilitates a panel discussion on how to progress marriage equality in Australia. A big four bank runs a major advertising campaign to address the gender salary gap and advocates equal pay for women. A major telco (along with another two major banks) introduces a hijab in company colours as part of their corporate uniform.

Why should the likes of EY, Baker & McKenzie, ANZ and Optus care about social issues? Plenty has been written about why a social conscience makes good business sense. You only have to look at the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) or Diversity and Inclusion policies of any these leading organisations to see they’ve taken a strong proactive stance. EY, for example, says, “Our focus on diversity and inclusiveness is integral to how we serve our clients, develop our people and play a leadership role in our communities. When we act on our commitment to diversity and inclusiveness, we maximise the power of our differences to achieve better business results, for ourselves and for our clients.”

It’s not just clever marketing. While there’s some risk for brands associating with politically sensitive subjects, the risk is far greater for organisations who shy away from taking the initiative on important issues. It is proven that organisations who show leadership on social issues:

  • Improve their public perception and increase their public profile
  • Attract, engage and retain the best employees
  • Appeal to a wider customer base and enjoy better relationships with customers

Professionals in private employment make up a significant proportion of the workforce. Our products and services have the potential to reach customers across the entire population. While arguably our views are represented at various levels of government by those representatives we’ve elected, I firmly believe there is an onus in the corporate sector to lead conversations that will shape the kind of world we’d like to work in, and live in.

What evidence have you seen of the commercial and social benefits of your organisation’s approach to corporate social responsibility? How has your organisation demonstrated leadership on a social issue or positively represented your Point of View?

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Posted in The world @work

Once small voices, now have a large impact

I ride the lift with a gorgeous blonde bombshell checking her lipstick in the mirror. Oh, awkward. As we step out on the same floor I realise she’s more than likely Catherine*, the candidate I’m scheduled to interview at 1.00pm. I’m hiring for an NFP CEO role and this is not what I had in mind. Wrong, wrong, wrong.

An hour later I’m eating my words. This fabulously talented, perfectly turned out candidate is just as remarkable in conversation as her career track record and a quick ride up the elevator would indicate.

How many of us are lucky enough to know a truly influential person? Not just someone of notoriety, with a big name or a prominent post. I’m talking about those individuals who are the whole package and do great work on behalf of all of us. People with vision and the passion to achieve it. My 1.00pm candidate is that whole package.

As a marketing and communications recruitment specialist, I’m fortunate to meet professionals who are really making a difference in their field.

What’s also trending is ‘social consciousness’ as a key influencer. Not only do influential people want a job that has a positive impact, they are also intentionally deciding not to work with organisations that have a negative impact on society. Global pressure on environmental concerns has seen investment banks, superannuation funds and universities divesting from fossil fuels. On social issues, international momentum for marriage equality or the humanitarian treatment of refugees are already impacting the Australian conscience. At grass roots we’re thinking critically before we throw money in the fundraising jar or make a charity donation these days: How will those dollars be spent?

Social media has empowered everyone with an internet connection to speak out. It’s elevated the consumer to critic. TV hosts, radio journalists and newspaper columnists are on notice. Companies can live or die by their Twitter feed, politicians are exposed to direct feedback from their electorate and sites like change.org can truly influence.

In this new media environment corporate social responsibility has been elevated to dizzying heights. No longer a nice to have, customers have become increasingly savvy, demanding quality products and services from ethical sources right along the supply chain. Just look at the growing markets for organics in grocery and beauty product lines, renewables in the electricity market and successful start-ups like Tom’s shoes, which literally give something (shoes) back.

Many businesses, as well as the individuals working in them, do want to make a difference. The current international climate is ripe for those who leave a legacy and have a large impact. In the past those with the loudest voices got the world’s attention. Now once small voices are being heard.

Do you know another Catherine* who is having an impact in your world @work?

*not her real name

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Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work