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Six ways to improve your workplace confidence

The word confidence has been on the forefront of my mind lately. Whether you are conscious of if it or not, confidence is an incredibly powerful feeling/belief that significantly impacts the way you carry yourself throughout life. Working in recruitment, confidence plays a vital role in how successful I am as a Consultant. I am lucky enough to work within an incredibly supportive team at Slade Group, who have given me the space to develop my confidence so I can perform at my highest potential.

Here are six ways to immensely improve your confidence in the workplace:

  1. Positive self-talk is key! Your thought process will dictate the way you act and therefore determine how others will treat you. If you practice positively reframing negative thoughts on a daily basis, you will eventually reprogram you thoughts to be more positive.
  1. Stop caring so much about what others think. It is human nature to desire validation from others, however it is not always required to succeed. When your headspace is not preoccupied stressing about the judgement of others, you have more room to channel your energy in productive ways.
  1. Competency = Confidence, it’s a simple equation. As a Recruitment Consultant, it is important that I maintain a well-rounded knowledge so I can make educated decisions and be a valid source of information for my candidates and clients. Put the time and effort into understanding what is going on around you! Remember to ask the right questions, pick up the Financial Review, and take notice of politics!
  1. Take care of yourself. There are many benefits involved when living a healthy life, including an increase in your confidence! Maslow made a timeless point, so it is no coincidence we constantly hear about “healthy eating, sleep patterns and exercise”. I certainly perform better at work when I make a healthy dinner and stick to my bedtime.
  1. Practice your Power Poses. Stand with your feet apart and hands on hips, pretend you are a super hero and feel the confidence surge throughout your entire body. Now I know this sounds silly but it works. Oprah does it… need I say more?
  1. Be authentic. Take the pressure off, don’t feel like you need to act a certain way. People who accept who they are, happen to be the most confident.

I hope reading this article gave you a big CONFIDENCE BOOST!

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Posted in Slade Business Support, The world @work

It’s not just about bringing croissants to morning tea!

Going back to see my family in France recently caused me to reflect on Australian multiculturalism. Did you realise that in Australia one in four of us was born overseas?

I was born in Bar-le-Duc, a small town in France to a French mother and Moroccan father. My fiancé is German born Russian, and we live (soon to be married) in Melbourne, Australia.

I have always been fascinated and sometimes challenged by different cultures. From a very young age, I developed an instinctive ability to adapt to other cultures. Spending my summer breaks at my grandma’s in Morocco, I was not the little French girl anymore – In my heart I deeply felt like a Moroccan girl. It has not only been adapting to another language, I even feel the tone of my voice and my facial expressions changing in different cultural situations.

However, when you move to a new country, you take it to the next level… Sometimes you find yourself completely lost, and not only in translation!

Allow me to share a memorable story from my time as a stewardess on a beautiful catamaran in The Kimberley. Freshly arrived from France, I decided to take up the challenge of working as a crew member in a team of seven. As the only woman! The challenge was real for many different reasons, but the language barrier created some hilarious situations.

There we were, on the first night on the boat and these deckhands start sharing stories about “Old Mate”. What followed was every night, when we were hanging out in the galley to do the dishes and share a beer, I would hear them mentioning their Old Mate again and again. After nearly a week, tired of being the only one who didn’t know this guy, I got the courage to finally ask, who is this Old Mate that everyone knows? In case you’re not familiar with the colloquialism, using Old Mate in place of the subject’s name in an anecdote assumes that the listener can identify them within the context – or not. Sometimes Old Mate’s a generic person who is irrelevant to the point of the story.

When I first started working in a professional environment, I thought I was doing a great job by arousing interest, soliciting for business and suggesting to clients they seduce candidates without realising the literal translation of those words and their cultural implications!

People are curious by nature, so when they notice my accent in person or on the phone it’s often a great conversation starter. I still make the occasional faux pas, but I’ve learnt how to own it by making it my point difference, whether I’m networking or socialising.

Cultural competence, in brief, is the ability to interact effectively with people from different cultures. In today’s workplaces, cultural diversity is part of everyday life. If I were to think about why embracing – actually I’d say celebrating – cultural diversity matters, I would put it in the following terms: Capturing unique talent; Boosting innovation; Encouraging productivity.

Of course your attitude towards cultural differences depends on your world view, but I would highly recommend investing in developing your cross-cultural skills… which is not just about bringing croissants to morning tea.

Given Australia’s multicultural society, how do you make the most of the different cultures in your world @work? What’s different about you that works to your advantage?

 

Interested in French style? Join me for Slade Chats with ‘French Chic’ Caroline Vosse – FrenChicTouch blogger, public speaker and entrepreneur at 6pm on Wednesday 13 June 2018. Click here  for details.

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Posted in Slade Business Support, The world @work

Your next job interview: How to present the best version of you

No matter how experienced you are, interviewing for a new role can be a stressful experience. Pressure from your current job (if you are working) and whatever else is going on in your life, such as family and financial stress, can dictate whether you are successful at interview.

Preparation is key. Understanding the role you are applying for and researching the organisation, and the managers or executives interviewing you, are integral to your ability to be en pointe during interview.

To give you the best chance of success, here are my ‘most likely’ from the Glassdoor’s Top 50 most often asked at interview. Nail these and you’ve nailed your interview:

  1. What are your strengths and weaknesses?
  2. Why are you interested in working for us?
  3. Where do you see yourself in 5 years? 10 years?
  4. Why do you want to leave your current company?
  5. Why was there a gap in your employment between these two dates?
  6. Tell me about an accomplishment you are most proud of.
  7. Tell me about a time you made a mistake.
  8. Describe yourself in 3 words?
  9. Give me an example of how you handled a difficult situation.
  10. Give a time when you went above and beyond the requirements for a project.
  11. Who are our competitors?
  12. What was your biggest failure?
  13. What motivates you?
  14. Tell me about a time when you disagreed with your boss.
  15. How do you handle pressure?
  16. What is the name of our CEO?
  17. What are your career goals?
  18. If I called your boss right now and asked him/her what is an area that you could improve on, what would he/she say?
  19. What was the last book you read for fun?
  20. What are your hobbies?

It is worth thinking through answers to the above questions. You don’t have to learn answers robotically, but it is a good idea to be prepared for these topics. There are often no right or wrong answers, it is about your confidence and the interviewers getting to know you as a person.

If you want to make a great first impression it is important to work out your ‘hook’. Telling a concise well planned story that displays your strengths, including a key characteristic you know they are looking for, is an excellent way to do it!

Give real examples of your strengths that are applicable to the role you are interviewing for; this will make it evident that you are a perfect fit for the role.

Prepare a list of follow-up questions to demonstrate your knowledge of the company, role and industry. Also, don’t be afraid to ask if there is anything missing in your skillset that they are looking for. It may be helpful to take a professional small hardcover notebook and refer to your notes, because when we are nervous, it is easy to forget what you had planned to say.

Mirroring the tone and pace of the interviewer is also a good way to appear relaxed and help you fit in with the interviewer’s style of communication.

Before you walk into the building take a ‘power pose’ and some deep breaths on the way up in the lift – this really helps your confidence.

Of course, honesty is always the best policy and being your authentic self shows integrity and confidence.

Interviewing is always going to be difficult and you may have to go through several rounds with panels of up to four people.

Stand out with your preparation, and don’t underestimate the effect of your personal presentation and polish. Ensure you are extremely well groomed, your clothes are comfortable for sitting and walking in… you’re one step closer to getting the job!

If you want to see the entire list, here are the 50 questions Glassdoor identified you are most likely to be asked during an interview.

What tips do you have for interview preparation?

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Posted in Slade Business Support

A homecoming with fresh eyes

We’ve written about the benefits of Boomerang Hires, but what’s it really like to leave a company and return again a couple of years later?

Two years ago I left Slade Group to see what life was like on the other side. Having consolidated my internal recruitment and industry knowledge in a consulting role, I went back to professional practice to work in a mid-tier accounting firm.

I learned a lot sitting at that desk. While it taught me about different operating systems and processes, I also learned something about myself – essentially that this new job was not for me; recruitment was where I wanted to develop the next chapter of my career.

In my next role I worked for a niche professional services recruitment firm, where I specialised in forensics, insolvency and corporate finance. Sounds dry if you’re outside the industry, actually a pretty exciting time for me. It allowed me to upskill, while expanding my network in the professional services sector. I grew the business, met some influential people and made many successful placements. There were even a few parties.

However over the course of leaving Slade and working in those subsequent roles, I was discovering what motivated me and finding out how I could add value to the company I worked for, as well as client organisations.

As a returning employee, you have an objective viewpoint. You’ve had the opportunity of new experiences with other businesses and the benefit of seeing your former employer with fresh eyes. For me the culture at Slade, the integrity of its leadership and the trust the brand enjoys (evidenced by longstanding relationships with clients, candidates, and former employees – myself included) were deciding factors in making my return when the time was right.

Today employees change jobs a lot more often over the course of their careers, and there is certainly an advantage to learning new skills in a new organisation that you can bring back. Culturally coming back to Slade was easy because I understood and respected its values. Flexibility and adaptability are critical in today’s market. Being agile, learning from different organisations and observing how others work has allowed me to realise new opportunities for the team I now lead. Likewise, being a knowledge specialist is equally important: clients appreciate my understanding of business support roles and my experience in industry.

When moving on from a job people often talk about the negatives that motivated them to looking elsewhere. The positives for me are always the people, colleagues and clients, where I established relationships based on the authenticity of a personal connection to the business.

Coming back to Slade was like leaving home in my early 20s. Heading off on many adventures and returning to my family home a bit older and wiser than when I left. You are much more appreciative about being looked after and having your favorite things!  At Slade my ‘favourite things’ means quality systems and processes, ongoing training, clear values, flexibility with time arrangements to pick up on life’s vagaries, and of course my colleagues and clients. When I walked in the door, it felt like my team already knew me, like I was welcomed back from a holiday.  I’m not one to get too comfortable, I enjoy taking risks, and there’s much to be done, but it’s a nice feeling to boomerang back to our Slade family.

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Posted in Slade Business Support, The world @work