Blog Archives

Call out for a call back!

Something I learned a number of years ago… always follow through with what you say you are going to do in business. Close out the deal, finish the process, you get the drift. If you say you are going to do something, then do it. If something is going to stop you from delivering on your promise, then face up to it, and come up with a solution.

In recruitment, sometimes we hear people say that recruiters don’t call them back when they have applied for a job. I understand this happens, and I’d like to think our processes are strong enough at Slade Group, that it is not a frequent occurrence with our candidates.

Whether it be an email to say that, unfortunately, you have been unsuccessful with your online application or a phone call to provide feedback after you have interviewed with a prospective employer, it’s the least we can do to be honest with candidates. It’s also the least we want to give – we often provide career advice, referrals to other employment opportunities and build lasting relationships with candidates who in turn become clients over the years. Slade Group is also an ISO 9001 Quality Accredited executive recruitment firm, our reputation with our customers (both clients and candidates) is on the line, so we really do want to get back to you.

For good measure, I always ask every candidate I have met to ensure that they keep in touch with me as well, within a timeframe we have agreed.

It makes sense in business (in fact any relationship) that you’re likely to be more successful if you endeavour to build rapport with the people you are dealing with. For a candidate, the recruitment process typically means taking a big step in their career. For the organisations we represent, there is an element of risk to taking on a new employee and we do our utmost to ensure the candidate we refer is the right fit.

So it’s a little puzzling when, well into negotiations with a candidate, I have put forward a great offer from the company I am representing and then there is… silence, crickets! You begin to wonder what has happened?

Giving the elusive candidate the benefit of the doubt (maybe they are sick or maybe they are caught up in a meeting?) it’s OK to excuse a couple of hours. However, if the candidate is a person who is usually on top of returning calls it can certainly be disconcerting.

Recruitment can be like dating, sitting around waiting for someone to call you… after a while you get the drift, and you know they aren’t going to call. You have most likely experienced it or may have even done it yourself. (Why don’t they call???)

If you are dealing with a recruiter who has put you forward for a role and being a highly sought after talented individual, you receive an offer, I encourage you to act with integrity and finish the process. Talk to your consultant about why you have reservations about taking the role. A good recruiter will listen, see if there is something they can do to help, and if not you can still walk away. Leave a good impression, be professional, finish the process. Regardless of the outcome. It’s polite, courteous and the very least you could do.

 

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in Slade Executive

Nowadays, flattery will get you nowhere

How the pendulum has swung! Just ten years ago when making approaches to potential candidates by phone, I could virtually hear their flattered voices. In 2018 those potential candidates are fielding calls from numerous consultants for multiple roles, and in those voices I now sometimes detect the sound of annoyance.

The market is as tight as ever with organisations needing top technical talent yesterday. The ever-expanding landscape in Victoria and NSW particularly driven by major infrastructure projects, means that technical specialists and executives are constantly in high demand.

As a recruiter, change is something we encourage. One of the reasons I am proud of the brand we have at Slade Group, is that we thrive on our ability to swim upstream in an industry where it can often be easier to go with the flow… We work with our clients and candidates so that even though we’re headhunters, nobody we work with ever feels they have been randomly targeted to end up as ‘professional roadkill’.

How do we break away from the pack?

We don’t expect candidates to move quickly. Would you? If someone called you out of the blue asking if you wanted to look at another job, would you blindly give your details? I wouldn’t. We take the time when we reach out to candidates to get to know them, their career aspirations, their likes and dislikes, and what they do for fun. We figure out if the candidate is the right fit for an organisation’s culture, and if a certain company culture is the right fit for the candidate. It goes both ways for the candidate and the client. Success and growth should be attainable for both parties, and it’s the long-term picture that we look at when we’re recruiting for a role.

We retain our work. Slade Group work with a large majority of our clients on a retained assignment basis, which is when we take a part payment from engagement to placement of the candidate. I know, you’re probably wondering why someone would pay up-front for a service they can get from a number of others, but it’s because when we take a retained assignment we see it as a project: If you paid someone to do your homework, you’d expect to receive an A+. This is exactly how we approach our retained assignment projects.

We take a thorough brief from the client, we take the time to understand what they need and don’t just guess what they need. We commit our reputation, time and effort just as much as we ask the client to commit to us, and with that commitment we do it properly. We have the best research team in the business who we engage to map the market to help establish your strategy. We want to get this right for you, as if we worked at your company.

We set realistic expectations. When we engage with our clients, we set expectations and we don’t take an assignment we can’t fill. We work with you and guide you through our shared journey. You receive a detailed schedule on what to expect when, and we leave you to get on with your day job.

If you’ve been headhunted, what was the experience like? What would you look for when considering the best way to recruit for your business?

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work

It’s a 3 step process: Resign with dignity; Goodbyes with self-respect; Start anew with collegial engagement.

It can be a pretty tough time that business of resigning and changing jobs. We all know it’s typically rated amongst some of the most stressful events in life.

Over the years, I have seen countless people go through the process of resigning from their current job in order to take a step up, a leap into something new, or for a fresh start. As recruiters we support candidates when they resign, as they transition out of one organisation, onboard into a new organisation and transition into a new (often more senior) position.

I experienced this myself when joining Slade Executive this year and it reminded me of the importance of my role in ensuring every career transition is as smooth as possible.

So, armed with a fresh perspective on what it is like going through a resignation, leaving a company and starting in a new one, I thought I’d share some tips that can help you with your career transition. If you follow my advice, you won’t be thinking ‘What have I done?’; I guarantee you’ll be completely focused on putting all of your energy into making a success of your new role.

The resignation process

  1. The first thing to do is be one hundred percent sure you have considered this career change carefully. Ensure you have exhausted all avenues with your current employer so you can be confident that a role with another organisation is the right option.
  2. When considering a prospective employer, make sure you have covered all aspects of the role. Consider factors such as: the type of work you will be doing, location, hours, team culture, benefits and company position in the market. Does the ethos of the organisation resonate with your own values? Are you excited by the opportunity? I put a lot of weight on my instinct (backed-up by doing my own research) when making such an important decision and encourage all of my candidates to do the same.
  3. Never let your decision to move on be solely about money. Being appropriately remunerated is important and extra dollars no doubt make a difference financially. However, without the less tangible things I have mentioned above, you may find yourself in the same situation sooner than you think – a short-term gain for longer-term pain is simply not worth it.
  4. Be respectful! Be prepared when resigning to discuss your reasons for leaving in a concise manner. Being able to articulate how you came to make that decision shows that you have not taken it lightly. If you have an exit interview, be honest. Constructive feedback reflects well on you and can help the organisation improve.

Moving out

  1. Work through to the end with integrity. After you have resigned, it can be a bit awkward. Put in all of your usual effort as if you had not resigned until your final day.
  2. Discuss an appropriate narrative with your current employer. Be professional when advising clients and colleagues that you’re leaving.
  3. Always leave on good terms. Be appreciative of the opportunity you have had and thank the people you have worked with. Remember, without the work you have accomplished with your current employer, you may not have had the opportunity to pursue a new challenge.

 Moving in

  1. Don’t bad mouth your former employer. Never do this because it really is in poor taste and doesn’t show integrity.
  2. Be yourself. During the recruitment process we assess cultural fit, so you can be comfortable that you will fit in just as you are.
  3. Take the time to get to know your team. There are many different personalities to get to know in a new organisation, so take the time to meet and build a rapport with your new team and colleagues at all levels.

I’m here to help you get it right!

I genuinely care (as all good recruiters should) about your wellbeing. I understand that this isn’t just a job, it’s your career. Your reputation is at stake and the decision to move, whether voluntarily or otherwise, impacts greatly on your personal life. It’s also my job to ensure that I know the culture of the organisations I recruit for. I investigate career progression opportunities for new hires, look at project work undertaken, and assess all of the company benefits to thoroughly equip candidates with the necessary information to ensure the role is a good fit for both parties.

If you are considering a move and would like to have a confidential conversation or are looking for talent for your organisation, please feel free to contact me.

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work