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And just like that, I’m off to a new team!

In November I’m taking on a new role with the Carlton Football Club as a full time coach in an elite sporting environment. I’ll be going from working as a corporate recruiter to working with elite sportsmen and women.

It may sound weird, but after what I’ve learnt through 2017, I feel so much more prepared for what’s to come.

Here are some key learnings from my time here with the Slade Group, let’s call it the 5 P‘s.

1/ Pace

Boy was I slow! When you start a new role you want to double check things, make sure you’re not stepping on toes and listen and learn as much as you can. Note to self: Jason, don’t over think things or double guess – you’ll learn as you go and be much more valuable learning by doing.

2/ Punctuality

Sounds simple in the professional world, but I am still amazed by the lasting negative impact of people who think it’s ok to be late, or not show up at all to interviews. This has left me with an underlying anxiety never to be late to anything myself. Or, if it’s unavoidable I’ll always call ahead and tell the truth.

3/ People

Recruiting is all about people. Every step of the way, and on every recruitment assignment I’ve dealt with people as candidates, as clients, and as colleagues. There are no widgets in the work we produce. In life we all make mistakes, can inadvertently let others down, and over time learn about our strengths and weaknesses. How we react to and handle difficult situations, is the important bit. That goes for me as well. Make the tough calls, and be honest and fair. People appreciate and respect this much more than smoke and mirrors.

4/ Preparation

Talk about added stress by not being prepared. Yes things move quickly, but systems are in place to help you cope and keep track. Use them! You’re a part of a team or better yet, a brand, and if you are unprepared that’s a bad look for all of you.

5/ Pride

One thing I quickly learnt heading into, and during, my consulting role is that there is still some stigma around recruitment. It didn’t make a lot of sense as I had never had any personal experiences with recruiters prior to becoming one. But once I started meeting with clients and candidates I learnt they were happy to share their issues. I listened. Maybe I just got lucky, but my time here at Slade Group was nothing but professional and personable. I couldn’t count how many people I’ve come across both internally and externally in the last year or so who have taught me more than any book or university ever could. As I now say when discussing who I work for, “you don’t survive as a brand in this space for 50 years if you’re not doing a lot right.”

Now looking forward

At the start of the year I set out on a new journey. I made the switch from not-for-profit to the corporate world in order to test my skills and pace in the recruitment space. I joined Team Slade and when I look back now, it’s fair to say I had little idea about what lay ahead, and it’s also fair to add that I still have a long way to go if I return one day to become a top flight senior  consultant.

Can you remember some of the Aha moments in your first year in a new role in your world @work?

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How sports coaches use world class leadership to create winning teams

Before I elaborate, I have a confession to make… I’m an ex senior AFL player, now a football coach and more recently, a professional recruiter.

To outsiders, a senior coach is the face of their club, much like a hiring manager is a window to their organisation. They are engaging and genuinely passionate, or as cold as stone.

The strengths of a good coach are universal, but let’s tackle the sport I’m most familiar with – AFL football. Consider the 2016 reigning premiership coach, Western Bulldogs’ Luke Beveridge.

Beveridge walks the fine line between instilling confidence in his players, and holding them accountable for their actions and behaviours.  All the while, he demands exceptional on-field performance.

It is well documented that since commencing his tenure as Senior Coach he has focussed on open and honest communication. He’s built strong relationships with the players, the club, its supporters and a wide range of people associated with the sport, including commentators, the media, and sponsors. These are not unlike the types of relationships we aim for in business when interacting with our clients or customers (who for me in recruitment are candidates), colleagues, suppliers and even competitors in our professional networks.

Much like recruitment, in professional sport, and AFL football in particular, nearly every transaction includes working with the uncontrollable elements inherent in dealing with people. In sport and recruitment alike, those without the qualifications or the requisite experience to pass judgement, often shout the loudest and voice the most criticism.

For Beveridge his clients are predominantly made up of both existing and potential club sponsors and members. These clients have made financial commitments and naturally want to see a return on their investments. In this context a winning performance as a coach could mean a cohesive team, with high levels of morale amongst players, who have the motivation to attend training and associated club events, and are well supported by family. It may translate to increased membership, a higher media profile, greater sponsorship and other opportunities. A winning team is more than match winning performances – think of the otherwise poor practices of the West Coast Eagles circa their 2006 Premiership.

High level sport, in some aspects, is not much different to the corporate sector. We’re juggling all manner of expectations from various parties. There are set timeframes (seasons) with efficiency targets (statistics). In business and sport, we all have to consider best process and methodology. Importantly, just has Beveridge does, we have to establish a culture and live the values, brand and standards of our organisation. Sound familiar?

Some players, as with corporate talent at the top of their game, are hot property.

In other cases some candidates are like promising young players; potential but struggling with form, gaining experience but not quite good enough – yet. How Beveridge manages the pool of talent in his playing group is his greatest challenge, because although he understands the industry and his client demands, his players output and abilities will often predicate game results.

So, would Luke Beveridge be the sort of manager you’d like to have in your organisation? Based on the attributes we’ve explored, I think so. His stakeholder management skills and ability to communicate with a broad range of people and personalities would be a strength. He has the proven experience in implementing a game plan, follows process, allowing him to work efficiently and consistently. Lastly, and I think most importantly, it would be his character and the impact he has on his organisation’s culture. His confident and engaging personality, combined with his strategic thinking, willingness to provide feedback and people management skills would make him successful in a non-sport leadership role. I’d like to recruit him.

Which qualities do you value in a manager? Who would you like to recruit to for your team?

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Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work