Blog Archives

“Let me call you back” – Recruitment trends shaping the job market in 2020

In this episode of The Job Hunting Podcast, host Renata Bernarde interviews Anita Ziemer. Anita talks about recruitment and selection trends in 2020, the aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic, the economic downturn and how it’s affecting the job market. She speaks candidly about her profession and how candidates can better work with recruiters. She gives job hunters inside tips, from understanding the mechanics of the recruitment and selection process to making your resume more effective, and your skills more easily noticed by the recruiter.

Other episodes in the same series:

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The world @work

This will be a thing. Face masks in the workplace.

I had never understood face mask wearing in public. To me, face masks indicated a cultural misunderstanding, a weird convention I couldn’t grasp. Were the wearers suggesting our pollution levels were up there with Shanghai’s, were we particularly foul mouthed, or were they themselves escapees from some infectious sanatorium? 

I’ve now done a backflip on this thinking. The more facts I read about ‘Face Masks’ the more convinced I am that they will be key to us getting back to business as usual. Or at least close to BAU.

While a mask won’t necessarily save the wearer if exposed, it lessens the likelihood of infection. How it really helps is in protecting ‘the other’ from the ‘wearer’. That insight flipped my judgement of public mask wearing from ‘negative and weird’ to ‘positive and respectful’. 

Supporting evidence is mounting by the countries ‘beating’ COVID-19:

  • Taiwan – Masks are mandated in many public areas such as public transport
  • China – Any region or city where there is the slightest trace of the virus, the wearing of masks is mandated by law
  • South Korea – The Government has sent face masks to every house
  • Singapore and Hong Kong – Have urged all citizen to wear masks all the time, as a sign of respect to others and a small amount of self-protection
  • Czech Republic, Austria, Slovakia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Israel – mandated public mask wearing

Results are showing improved reductions in new case rates when mask wearing is combined with various stages of lock downs.

A bandanna, an old school cotton handkerchief or a pharmacy bought face mask will help us all, and maybe get us back to work, and on with life, as we knew it.  If we all get on board, it will normalise the previously abnormal.

What do you think about face masks in your world @work?

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The world @work

Prescience!

Don’t it always seem to go
That you don’t know what you’ve got til it’s gone
They paved paradise
And put up a parking lot.

Thanks Joni Mitchell

I’m grateful this week. Enormously grateful to our Federal Government for the recently legislated JobKeeper initiative. Grateful that six million Australians might retain some semblance of a career, continuity of employment, a basic living wage and for organisations to ward off insolvency. Imagine the alternative – never ending Centrelink queues, mental health catastrophes, insolvency tsunamis and potential civil unrest.

Maybe we did have some idea that the music at the fairground would be quieted, the lights dimmed and we’d be seeing out a long night. Maybe it was one too many entitled ‘meh’s’ that got me on my soap box when I referred to the privilege of work at an introductory welcome I gave back in December. Slade Group sponsored the VCCI luncheon with The Hon. Richard Wynne, Victorian Minister for Planning and Housing, and on rereading the few paragraphs it does paint a backdrop for the richness of a working life – did we know how much we’d miss it when it was gone? (And for all the healthcare workers and those in the food staples supply chain, I wish for you that the music does soon slow, the merry-go-round you’re on is going way too fast for comfort.)

‘Minister Wynne, around the table we’re a microcosm of Victoria at work, supporting Australians in their daily lives. One of our own key-lines at Slade Group is ‘Love Work, Love Life’.  

Unlike the social media posts that reference ‘Hump Day’ as the day you have to suffer to get closer to the weekend, or ‘Thank God It’s Friday,’ we know differently. We know that work is also a privilege and leads to better lives…, mental health and… family wellness and prosperity… Just ask the young Greeks… who in 2014… were up against a 30% unemployment rate, OR the South African health system… that knows in pockets, where unemployment is over 30%… so is the spike in AIDS. That’s why the ‘jobs jobs jobs’ pitch of any government is so important.

This year, across our Group we’ve appointed Non-Executive Directors, CEOs, CFOs, and Divisional Directors to leading national organisations…, academic and professional leaders across education and government and the arts…, worked heavily with Victoria’s infrastructure and property and rail sectors… We manage major on-hired contracts, and we are working against the tide in sourcing digital and technical talent where demand far outstrips supply.

Collectively, I think you’d agree that we’re fiercely proud of Melbourne and Victoria.

We depend on our elected Ministers and our respected Public Servants to develop policy and make decisions in the public interest. We’re on the brink of sharing this city with 5 million people, many of whom are also new to our country and whom we have to invest in to ensure they will also benefit from our built environment, our infrastructure, distribution and logistics, digital and technical investments, health, education, our arts and culture, and our precious natural resources.

Richard Wynne was the guest speaker, generous with his time, answering a lot of questions around planning, none of which much occupy our thoughts right now.

How are you managing through this changed world @work?

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in The world @work

Why not a New Year Career Resolution!

Taking the next steps to advance your career can be a stressful and lonely experience.

Slade Group is proud to partner with Renata Bernade who has developed ‘Job Hunting Made Simple’, a 7-week online course and group coaching programme that will show you how to plan and advance your career that is intentional, inspiring and fun.

Job Hunting Made Simple was created for people who are:

  • serious about their future career progression, but unsure how to achieve their goals;
  • in-between jobs and not knowing if they’re putting their time and effort into the right strategies.
  • returning to work after an extended break, not knowing how the market will perceive them; and
  • ready to look for new job opportunities, but just can’t find the time or focus to do it!

The program is opening soon and is accepting interest now! Job Hunting Made Simple will start in January 2020 and registrations open on Thursday 19 December. Go to renatabernarde.com/sladegroup or reply to this blog post to request more information.

Towards the end of the programme you’ll be hosted by Slade Group in a networking session, meet your fellow course participants, catch up with your favourite recruiters and receive direct ‘word on the ground’ employer feedback.

We’re delighted to finish our year on a high, and wish you a very happy festive season, and a wonderful New Year.

If you or someone you know would like to start 2020 with refreshed career ambitions please let us know and we’ll put you in touch with Renata Bernade.

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in The world @work

Why is it even a contest? Roads and Rail vs Tech and Digital.

It makes us feel we’re a nation on the move seeing the worker bees in High Vis vests bringing impressive infrastructure spending to life. Cities and populations are growing and we need improved roads and rail services. Great. But what happens at the end of the line?

Building roads and rail doesn’t, in and of itself, add to our GDP. It creates jobs for now, on the tax payer’s dime, filtered through major construction companies. It’s a centuries old model that makes sense and is understood by the electorate as a necessary and valuable addition to our cities and regional centres.

But all this visible ‘concrete’ activity means we risk a drift into the ‘also-rans’ of world economies if our Federal and State Governments don’t get more critical workforce planning sorted. We’re far from being known as global leaders in technology and digital. Consider the following recent observations:

  • John Durie in The Australian wrote that Israel’s ‘start-up nation’ success is built in part on a model of generous government incentives.
  • What should an accountant say to a successful early stage start-up who asks the question, “Why don’t we move to Singapore, where the tax incentives are very attractive?”
  • At the Rampersand Investor briefing on November 11th, two of the growing tech businesses lamented the lack of government grants and incentives, in spite of the fact that they are the future big employers governments need to realise their ‘jobs jobs jobs’ rhetoric.  
  • In the next three years alone the Robotic Data Automation Services sector is forecast to grow by $2B globally (HFS Research, 2018).  Where is Australia in this growth?
  • Ginnie Rometty, IBM’s CEO says we need to change our approach to hiring, as 100% of jobs will change in the future and AI is coming at us fast.
  • How will Australia attract more global tech players to our shores if our tech and digital talent has to go abroad to build their own stellar careers?

The cry of Jobs jobs jobs has become a hollow call out if we don’t Work work work on being future ready. Industry can’t do it alone, universities can’t do it alone. This requires high level resolve at a government level to create an environment to supercharge the virtual traffic routes of tomorrow. And if that means employer and employee incentives and grants, the short-term costs will be Australia’s gain in the longer term.

Am I the only Jo Public who is alarmed by our collective Federal and State Governments’ lack of vision?

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Slade Executive, Technical & Operations, The world @work

An erudite lesson in global politics

On a wet Oaks Day in Melbourne I backed a lunchtime invitation to hear Lord Chris Patten speak at the State Library of Victoria ahead of the races. He reflected a little on Brexit ‘psycho-mania’ (now my new favourite term) and a lot more on Hong Kong and China.

Christopher Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC served as the 28th and last Governor of Hong Kong from 1992 to 1997 and Chairman of the Conservative Party from 1990 to 1992. He was made a life peer in 2005 and has been Chancellor of the University of Oxford since 2003. 

Self-deprecating one minute and giving Cambridge University some Oxford one-upmanship in the next,  he also spoke at length of China and Hong Kong’s ‘one country – two systems’.   Unexpectedly, what really struck me, and other guests, was how he spoke without fear or favour.  He appealed again for China to stand by the one country – two systems commitment that was made in 1997.  He articulated his own democratic and faith based personal values. It was striking in Australia, where this year we’ve become more and more aware of a real or perceived threat of surveillance, to hear some speak so candidly in a public forum.

How is it that I have become conscious in 2019 of self-censoring, something that has never crossed my mind before? Would Lord Patten be turned around at the Beijing Airport?   In business, judiciousness and confidentiality are part and parcel of our work, but not until this year have I sensed the heightened influence of China across industry, academia and government in Australia.

Lord Patten’s gently-paced, candid and humour speckled delivery was a rare treat. His ability to be in the moment with his audience was captivating.  There were neither weasel words nor vanilla platitudes and the State Library guests enjoyed an unquestionable win on Oaks Day.

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work

Young people entering the workforce

The Boardroom Podcast in conversation with Anita Ziemer, Managing Director of Slade Group, about young people entering the workforce and the future of industries with the presence of automation.

The Boardroom Podcast is a series of engaging podcasts discussing the journey of and lessons learnt from many insightful industry leaders guests with a focus on having real and authentic conversations.

Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Business Support, Interchange Bench, The world @work

6 quick facts to bring you up-to-date on the Australian labour market and contract talent.

For your interest, we’ve collated a snapshot of current headline employment data.  It may help us to all make better sense of some unusual pressures you may be seeing regarding attraction and retention of high performers and why supplementary contract specialists are the new norm.

  1. Yes, high performing talent is getting harder to find. The latest Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data shows that full-time employment increased 11,800 to 8,697,600 and part-time employment increased 11,200 to 4,014,000. Contractor and temporary talent can fall into both these categories.
     
  2. More people are working: monthly hours worked in all jobs increased 1.3 million hours to 1758.9 million hours.
     
  3. ABS data collection shows that there are approximately 1,000,000 independent contractors – nearly 10% of the Australian workforce. (Depending on their portfolio of assignments in any one year, contractors and temporary staff can choose to be employed through the Interchange Bench directly, or through their own company.)
     
  4. Casual employees – that is employees who work without regular or systematic hours, or an expectation of continuing work – account for over 20% of the Australian workforce. (The Interchange Bench works closely with employers who have a large casual workforce to ensure that they comply with tightening restrictions on the definition of ‘casual’. Call us if you have any queries.)
     
  5. Trending: contract and temporary employees continue to offer employers great flexibility in resourcing, enabling organisations to hire right for skill, special projects, fixed-term or budgetary and headcount provisions.

  6. Business as usual in most organisations now includes temporary and contract specialists working alongside permanent staff.
Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Interchange Bench, The world @work