Monthly Archives: November 2019

An erudite lesson in global politics

On a wet Oaks Day in Melbourne I backed a lunchtime invitation to hear Lord Chris Patten speak at the State Library of Victoria ahead of the races. He reflected a little on Brexit ‘psycho-mania’ (now my new favourite term) and a lot more on Hong Kong and China.

Christopher Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC served as the 28th and last Governor of Hong Kong from 1992 to 1997 and Chairman of the Conservative Party from 1990 to 1992. He was made a life peer in 2005 and has been Chancellor of the University of Oxford since 2003. 

Self-deprecating one minute and giving Cambridge University some Oxford one-upmanship in the next,  he also spoke at length of China and Hong Kong’s ‘one country – two systems’.   Unexpectedly, what really struck me, and other guests, was how he spoke without fear or favour.  He appealed again for China to stand by the one country – two systems commitment that was made in 1997.  He articulated his own democratic and faith based personal values. It was striking in Australia, where this year we’ve become more and more aware of a real or perceived threat of surveillance, to hear some speak so candidly in a public forum.

How is it that I have become conscious in 2019 of self-censoring, something that has never crossed my mind before? Would Lord Patten be turned around at the Beijing Airport?   In business, judiciousness and confidentiality are part and parcel of our work, but not until this year have I sensed the heightened influence of China across industry, academia and government in Australia.

Lord Patten’s gently-paced, candid and humour speckled delivery was a rare treat. His ability to be in the moment with his audience was captivating.  There were neither weasel words nor vanilla platitudes and the State Library guests enjoyed an unquestionable win on Oaks Day.

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MMXIX (that’s 2019, or Mixed Media and I with two kisses)

Let’s talk about being a Graduate student in the 21st century. Finally getting that piece of paper – saying you’ve completed a degree! It’s exciting, a huge sense of relief, finally all your hard work has paid off. Then it dawns on you and the flush off questions start to power your mind. What do I do now? I need to find a job! How do I get a job? How do I compete with everyone?

Not knowing your career future is overwhelming and intimidating. Being a graduate myself I can safely say the thought of not getting hired for a job that is within the field you want to work in is daunting.

I recently had my graduate exhibition at RMIT University. Titled MMXIX, the event was designed to showcase a piece of work from each student from the graduate class of Digital Media. The exhibition was filled with amazing talent from my fellow classmates. It was a celebration of achievement and hard work. The night ended on a high, but as we all started to pack up our mixed media installations from our various projects, I felt bitter sweet that it was all over. I couldn’t believe how fast three years had gone by! What next? What is my next chapter going to look like?

Prior to graduating I had already spent hours scrolling through the pages of every job seeking website Australia had to offer. Perfecting and reworking my website portfolio an obscene amount of times. Writing countless cover letters, redrafting my resume and updating my LinkedIn profile. Yet after all the preparation in the world, I was still hesitant about finding a job – What if no one wants to hire me? It can be imitating knowing how many grad students are competing for the same opportunities, especially in 2019 where searching for work is already a minefield. Wanting to be the best candidate possible for an employer plays on your mind a lot.   

Having the opportunity to be able to gain work experience at Slade Group and working alongside such an amazing group of staff has taught me entering the industry is motivating. It is what we have been working towards our whole degree! We should feel overjoyed about entering the workforce not nervous.

A wise woman once told me – my mother to be exact, you need to back yourself! And what I mean by that is, is be proud off your achievements, flaunt what you can bring to the table. You can do all the preparation in the world, but I believe the key is to be proud and back your accomplishment and the work will come to you. #backyourself

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What are the myths (and facts) on ageing and work?

The Australian population is ageing. This has led to a lot of public policy and debate around the need to reduce welfare costs and respond to projected shortfalls in labour as older workers retire in large numbers.

Prolonging the working life in an inclusive way, and promoting solidarity of different employee life stages, are key issues in the workplace.

To help [organisations] with this, Professor Philip Taylor from Federation University Australia and DCA are tackling some misconceptions around age and work.

Myth #1: Age discrimination towards older workers is endemic
Reality: Age discrimination is potentially faced by all workers

While it is often characterised as a problem solely experienced by older people, in fact, young people experience age discrimination too. Age discrimination manifests in many forms – a lack of employment, under-employment, during recruitment, lack of career opportunities, and stereotyping.

Myth #2: Different generations have different orientations to work
Reality: It is employee life stage (e.g. school leaver, working parent, graduating to retirement) that makes a big difference – not generation

Generational constructs such as ‘Millennial’ or ‘Boomer’ are caricatures which provide a poor basis for making employment decisions. Instead, providing age inclusion over the entire employee lifecycle is key – from school leavers looking for their first work experience, to people seeking return to work after raising children, through to older workers wanting to transition to retirement.

Myth #3: Older people are a homogenous group
Reality: Older and younger people have intersectional parts of their identity which impacts on how they experience inclusion at work

People aren’t one-dimensional. Whether people are older or younger, it is how the multiple aspects of their identity intersect that impacts on how they experience inclusion at work.

Myth #4: Older workers outperform younger ones in terms of their reliability, loyalty, work ethic and life experience
Reality: Performance is not linked to age – except in very rare instances

These are age stereotypes. A better starting point for managers would be to not assume correlation between age and performance. Age-based decision-making is not only discriminatory, it also has no competitive advantage.

Myth #5: Older people have a lifetime of experience that managers should recognise
Reality: Relevant experience, is more valuable than experience, of itself

Life experience may sometimes be valued for a given role, but not always. It is better to consider what relevant experience people have and what, if any, gaps may need to be filled.

Myth #6: Younger workers are more dynamic, entrepreneurial, and tech savvy than older workers
Reality: Older people have a lot to offer the modern workplace

It should not be assumed that people have a given quality just because they are older or younger. Workplace policies should instead be built on a foundation of age neutrality.

Myth #7: Younger workers feel entitled and won’t stick around
Reality: Younger workers are more likely to be in insecure employment and to experience unemployment

Research shows that there is little link between age and someone’s commitment to work. This is just another example of an unfounded ageist stereotype.

Myth #8: Older people who stay on at work are taking jobs from younger people
Reality: Increasing the employment of older workers does not harm, and may even benefit, younger people’s employment prospects

Actually, research demonstrates that, across the OECD countries, increases in rates of older people’s employment are associated with higher youth employment rates or demonstrate no relationship at all. While young and old are sometimes characterised as being in conflict, the reality is that we are all in this together.

This article was written by Professor Philip Taylor. DCA members can read the full myth-buster on the Diversity Council Australia website.

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Posted in The world @work

More than a lucky break: How Maitham and others have achieved a better life through the power of a professional career.

Over the past two years I have had the privilege of pairing with a number of participants in the CareerSeekers program. This is a non-profit organisation supporting Australia’s refugees and migrants fleeing war-torn countries, and support them with language, interview and CV skills to assist them to settle into Melbourne.

Last year I met Maitham Abonassrya, an intern in the CareerSeekers program who completed his undergraduate Engineering degree in Iraq. Through CareerSeekers Maitham secured an internship in January this year, and after three months, was offered a 12-month contract.

Maitham received in-depth support as one of many refugees or asylum seekers who have so much to offer and to contribute back to Australia life through their working career. Some are currently studying at university or are looking to restart their professional career in Australia.

CareerSeekers partners with leading organisations to create paid internships, which provide valuable local experience and networks not readily available to new arrivals, which allow participants to build their careers and to settle faster and better in Australia.

What has always impressed me is how grateful participants are to be in Australia, and the passion they exhibit in wanting to contribute to our country and embrace the opportunity they have been given.

Maitham’s success and others like him are wonderful examples of how CareerSeekers has changed the life of people who have come to Australia seeking a better life.

To hear the stories of other CareerSeekers and to find out more about how you can participate in the program as an employer, go to careerseekers.org.au.

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Posted in Technical & Operations, The world @work