Monthly Archives: July 2019

7 steps to successfully implementing any new technology in the workplace

Implementing a new technology tool can be a huge challenge within an organisation. Slade Group recently upgraded all of our team from PCs to Surface Pros – a 2-in-1 detachable laptop/tablet, which truly allows us to work anywhere, from the desk to the sofa (we have several couches in breakout spaces within our office). While we love our new hardware and are adapting to its new software, there’s a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes to facilitate a smooth technology transition.

No matter that as consumers we all like to get our hands on something shiny, in a professional environment successfully implementing new tech means you’ll need to prep for the changeover, including organising employee training. Then check-in with your champions or super users, while keeping track of everyone’s progress, and provide additional support for those who are less tech-savvy. Post implementation it makes sense to evaluate the project, such as which aspects of the roll-out worked well and what could be improved next time.

Below are 7 steps to help ease your team through transition when implementing a new technology or process:

  1. Communication – Articulate the benefits of the new technology or process, explain what motivated the change and address what could be at stake if the implementation fails, giving ownership to everyone collectively.
  2. Transparency – From end user to senior management, keeping everyone in the loop is key to maintain support for the change, particularly if you hit a hurdle or the project is delayed.
  3. Keep it simple – Don’t over complicate the process. Start at the most basic level, progress in small steps and be prepared to have lots of patience.
  4. Have a knowledgeable support system – Not everyone learns at the same pace, so try to customise your training to adapt to different learning styles. Run multiple training sessions as well as one-on-one sessions, ensuring all employees know the basics of the technology before moving on to more detailed and complicated features.
  5. Incentivise technology use – Rewarding employees for their uptake and support is a fantastic way to increase productivity. Organise an awards event and establish prize categories to create a buzz about your achievements. Providing certificates or gift vouchers is relatively low cost to the overall success of your project.
  6. Feedback – Value opinions by taking the time to collect and address feedback. Employees who feel that their concerns have been heard and respected will ultimately be happier and more engaged in future.
  7. Evaluation – As with any change management project, adoption and some attrition will be ongoing, so monitoring the use of the new system/technology beyond the implementation phase is extremely important.

No matter what new technology or processes you are planning to implement in your business, following these simple steps will help you set the stage for a successful transition.

Now that I have the option to touch, type or handwrite on my Surface Pro, I’d love to hear about your experiences in the world @work… I’ll respond from my desk, or not!

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Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work

Dipping my toes in the ocean: A celebration of my first 10 years in Australia

In November I celebrated my 10 year anniversary as a proud Melbourne resident. My arrival here from South Africa coincided with the GFC, which has given me pause for thought around the 10 year economic cycle, and what I’ve seen in the local recruitment market during this time.

In my first year here, my beloved Tigers (yes, I have an AFL team) came second last to the Demons (substantial improvement since then). In my other passion, the Springboks had just won the World Cup (not so much improvement). I was also working from a small office in Mount Waverley recruiting Accountants in the South East (nothing wrong with that, but most would agree Collins Street is a substantial improvement).

The recruitment landscape has changed drastically in the last ten years, with some substantial players downsizing and others disappearing, while a number of newcomers quickly established themselves and continue to go from strength to strength. The market for talent continues to become ever more competitive, with the top-drawer operators demonstrating the value in building strong relationships, providing exceptional service and reducing hiring risk with a robust methodology.

Recruitment trends

Other trends have been the evolution of internal recruitment capability within medium to large organisations and conversely, the rise of the RPO (recruitment process outsourcing) model, with an increasing number of organisations ramping up this function. Whereas talent acquisition was previously limited to larger corporate organisations, increasingly SMEs and smaller businesses have added recruitment to their HR functions. This has delivered mixed levels of success. With no clear winner between the internal team and an outsourced or RPO model, a number of businesses have sought to return the function in-house. In the mix, professional recruiters like me have enjoyed the opportunity to partner with internal recruitment teams, especially on senior assignments and hard to source specialist roles where exploring the passive talent market is essential.

Sector trends

The industry landscape has seen some other big shifts, with sectors like Manufacturing and Print taking a massive hit. Technological change, including AI, robotics, automation and digitalisation is one of the factors at play, but the impact of globalisation and government policy on a whole range of issues, from tariffs and trade to employment regulations, has suited some more than others: Ecommerce, Education, Advanced Manufacturing, Engineering, and Food & Agribusiness are all growing well.

In the recruitment sector, a trend towards higher volume/lower level recruitment activity was obvious over the last decade. What is becoming increasingly clear, however, is that there will always be tremendous value for organisations in developing meaningful relationships with talent and the consultants who have access to diverse professionals across broad as well as niche industry networks.

I have been extremely fortunate to have met some outstanding people in the last ten years – clients, candidates and colleagues – and have thoroughly enjoyed watching their careers develop. In many instances they have become valued connections who continue to inspire me and others with their achievements. It has been an exciting ride!  Now working with Geoff Slade and the team at Slade Group (Geoff recently celebrated 50 years in business), I realise that the last ten years is just a drop in the ocean. Here’s looking forward to the next ten years in the world @work. Thanks to all of you for your valued support and friendship over the last decade.

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Posted in Accounting & Finance, The world @work

Take a break… and focus on your own learning and future career

…as the fourth revolution of work builds, teachers are well placed to lead learning.”

All employers, by virtue of offering work opportunities and the potential to build careers, deal in the futures of their employees. For teachers and others working in the education sector, it takes great skill, time and energy to help students navigate their learning and life. It is by its very nature a generous act, to continually focus on others to build their capacity, efficacy and future.

For teachers, the term breaks are ideal to recharge and relax, to practice a little self-preservation and to prioritise personal needs.

Article image: Have fun

If you are a teacher or another professional who constantly ‘gives to others’, putting a plan in place for your own future can be overlooked; a break can be more than relaxing – it can be a time to think about where your career is going, to set goals, speak to others and to think about what else you may need to learn to progress within schools or beyond.

In various articles on the Future of Work, ‘learning’ per se is at the centre of the skills and aptitude required to navigate the fourth revolution, and to enjoy a thriving career. This places teachers at the centre of the revolution. Teachers have highly transferable skills in planning, curating, managing and assessing learning. The industry of learning has always spread well beyond the school gates, but the industry globally is growing at an unprecedented rate. More than just formal institutions for learning, ‘the industry of learning’ increasingly includes significant roles such as learning designers in work settings.

Swinburne’s Centre for the New Workforce recently published a National Survey Report, Peak Human Potential: Preparing Australia’s workforce for the digital future. The report highlighted 38% of workers prefer to learn in the work setting. Heather McGowan, future of work strategist, suggests that we now work to learn.

As the fourth revolution of work builds, teachers are well placed to lead learning, from early learning centres to corporate boardrooms.

Before you lead others in their learning or work, you need to be strategic, and clear about your own learning and career plan. Our world @work represents so much of our time and energy, and yet career progression is often left to happenstance.

So, while you’re relaxing or setting off on an adventure, remember to put aside a little time to think about your own future of work.

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Posted in Education, The world @work