Monthly Archives: November 2017

Motherhood Statements are not on!

Recently I attended a webinar hosted by international communications experts rogenSi, where they talked about using more persuasive language in our everyday business communications. For me, this could mean meetings with colleagues, interviews with candidates, presenting my services as an executive recruitment consultant to potential clients, or pitching for a coaching gig in my other professional capacity.

The techniques discussed (see below for some quick tips), got me thinking about the level of expertise amongst the senior leaders and executives I work with every week. While highly experienced and knowledgeable in their fields, sometimes even talented people lack sophistication in their communication style.

The webinar went on to say that frequently, business people use ‘motherhood statements’ to attempt to convince others. That is, statements which are too general, too broad or too bland to have any meaning – the words simply don’t cut through. Here are some examples of the platitudes I hear: “I’m highly motivated”; “I’m ready for a new challenge”; “I’m a people person”. When we make motherhood statements we’re not heard. It could be because the language we have used isn’t precise, we haven’t backed-up our claims with appropriate evidence, or we generalised about the subject without making a specific point.

Former Rogen International CEO, Neil Flett, also addresses the issue in his very readable book: The Pitch Doctor. He’s emphatic: “Business people should avoid too much motherhood speak.” Flett’s analysis and the rogenSi webinar concur that what you say and how you say it can be key to becoming more memorable in your professional interactions.

Try these 5 tips to avoid motherhood statements:

  1. Statistics – use meaningful stats, not just big numbers
  2. Facts – inarguable facts are persuasive
  3. Examples – paint a picture, use SAO (Situation, Action and Outcome) to describe it
  4. Case Studies – talking openly, when permissible, about a winning bid that led to a successful project and the results achieved
  5. Tell a story – storytelling is most powerful when related to your own personal experience, when it allows you to share your passion and demonstrates that you really mean it

Take my advice, by using convincing language in future, I guarantee you will be more persuasive… Did I just make a motherhood statement?

What do you hear in your world@work that’s just really blah blah blah?

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Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work

It’s a 3 step process: Resign with dignity; Goodbyes with self-respect; Start anew with collegial engagement.

It can be a pretty tough time that business of resigning and changing jobs. We all know it’s typically rated amongst some of the most stressful events in life.

Over the years, I have seen countless people go through the process of resigning from their current job in order to take a step up, a leap into something new, or for a fresh start. As recruiters we support candidates when they resign, as they transition out of one organisation, onboard into a new organisation and transition into a new (often more senior) position.

I experienced this myself when joining Slade Executive this year and it reminded me of the importance of my role in ensuring every career transition is as smooth as possible.

So, armed with a fresh perspective on what it is like going through a resignation, leaving a company and starting in a new one, I thought I’d share some tips that can help you with your career transition. If you follow my advice, you won’t be thinking ‘What have I done?’; I guarantee you’ll be completely focused on putting all of your energy into making a success of your new role.

The resignation process

  1. The first thing to do is be one hundred percent sure you have considered this career change carefully. Ensure you have exhausted all avenues with your current employer so you can be confident that a role with another organisation is the right option.
  2. When considering a prospective employer, make sure you have covered all aspects of the role. Consider factors such as: the type of work you will be doing, location, hours, team culture, benefits and company position in the market. Does the ethos of the organisation resonate with your own values? Are you excited by the opportunity? I put a lot of weight on my instinct (backed-up by doing my own research) when making such an important decision and encourage all of my candidates to do the same.
  3. Never let your decision to move on be solely about money. Being appropriately remunerated is important and extra dollars no doubt make a difference financially. However, without the less tangible things I have mentioned above, you may find yourself in the same situation sooner than you think – a short-term gain for longer-term pain is simply not worth it.
  4. Be respectful! Be prepared when resigning to discuss your reasons for leaving in a concise manner. Being able to articulate how you came to make that decision shows that you have not taken it lightly. If you have an exit interview, be honest. Constructive feedback reflects well on you and can help the organisation improve.

Moving out

  1. Work through to the end with integrity. After you have resigned, it can be a bit awkward. Put in all of your usual effort as if you had not resigned until your final day.
  2. Discuss an appropriate narrative with your current employer. Be professional when advising clients and colleagues that you’re leaving.
  3. Always leave on good terms. Be appreciative of the opportunity you have had and thank the people you have worked with. Remember, without the work you have accomplished with your current employer, you may not have had the opportunity to pursue a new challenge.

 Moving in

  1. Don’t bad mouth your former employer. Never do this because it really is in poor taste and doesn’t show integrity.
  2. Be yourself. During the recruitment process we assess cultural fit, so you can be comfortable that you will fit in just as you are.
  3. Take the time to get to know your team. There are many different personalities to get to know in a new organisation, so take the time to meet and build a rapport with your new team and colleagues at all levels.

I’m here to help you get it right!

I genuinely care (as all good recruiters should) about your wellbeing. I understand that this isn’t just a job, it’s your career. Your reputation is at stake and the decision to move, whether voluntarily or otherwise, impacts greatly on your personal life. It’s also my job to ensure that I know the culture of the organisations I recruit for. I investigate career progression opportunities for new hires, look at project work undertaken, and assess all of the company benefits to thoroughly equip candidates with the necessary information to ensure the role is a good fit for both parties.

If you are considering a move and would like to have a confidential conversation or are looking for talent for your organisation, please feel free to contact me.

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Posted in Slade Executive, The world @work