Monthly Archives: August 2015

One question that can ‘read anyone’s mind’…

Needing to know now is critical to the flow of business. Here is one question learned early in my ‘headhunting’ career that cuts through time and 100 questions.

When conducting an Executive Search or Selection assignment, my job is to determine whether a candidate is genuinely interested in the opportunity I’ve presented. Everyone’s flattered when a Headhunter casts their lure; it’s tempting to nibble at the bait.

As a Headhunter, though, it’s vital that I swiftly work out whether there is serious interest or whether a candidate is just fishing… for just enough information to angle for a better offer from their current employer.

To elicit the real answer is no easy task. Not getting an answer can set the hiring process back substantially, leading to a missed opportunity for both the employer and the candidate.

When we have to wait in trepidation on an answer, it more than likely turns out to be a “no”. Instinctively we know that the person has already made up their mind, but does not want to offend us with the truth. Or they could be stalling for time as they are pursuing their first preference… you know how it goes. Sometimes candidates come back to the table with a half “yes” and lots of messy provisos, which equate to a “no” in any case.

When an important decision needs to be made, I guarantee this one question will uncover a person’s intention, even if they do not intend to show their hand:

“Please visualise us getting to the end of this hiring process. Providing all the pieces come together – do not give me an answer now,  just what do you guess you will say to me?”

Stop talking and listen, because here comes the answer.

They will say something like, “Well I guess I will say yes, but I just need to think about it (overnight/run it past my family/see what my partner says/etc.).” That’s ok, this is going to be a “yes”.

If they hesitate, then duck and weave with something like, “Look I really don’t know, I can’t even guess, my mind is not clear, have really got to think about it more…” unfortunately it will be a “no”. Move on to whatever your Plan B is, because eventually people come back and confirm that “no”.

So next time you’re asked to guess an answer don’t worry, we are just trying to read your mind.

What methods do you use to uncover people’s thoughts in your world @work, I’d like to know?

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Why everyone needs a Geek in the family

It used to be said that ideally every family needs a doctor, lawyer, plumber and chef in their ranks. I can’t say we have any of those, but we do have a particularly handy builder, a couple of digital media and marketing kids and a geek. Hey, who’s not proud of their kids? The Slade gang are on their way, on various rungs of their career ladder or starting out on their own.

Let me cover off Jack the Geek in this blog as he’s related to our world @work. Jack is building Procurious for his enterprising employer, Tania Seary in London.

For those of you who haven’t heard about it, Procurious is the vertical professional network for those working in procurement. There is a growing trend to create specialist verticals, away from the world mass of LinkedIn, towards meaningful, niche sector verticals. Sites like Doximity for physicians and healthcare professionals, Spiceworks for the ICT industry and Rallypoint for the military.

The lad has had a stellar two years taking Tania’s global procurement e-concept to reality and has learned how to build and translate a product strategy through to execution. Take a look at it here: procurious.com.au

In the meantime he runs his own e-passion at night, not in the garage, but on the couch at home; Boss Hunting was an idea he acted on while he was still at University.

What do you mean Boss Hunting, is that about looking for a good boss?” I asked at the time.

No you fossil, Boss means cool. They are hunting for what’s cool.”

This year he’s taken the Facebook page to a full content website at bosshunting.com.au. Its target audience is 16 – 34 year old males, with the odd proud mother thrown in to skew the data. 250,000 followers isn’t bad, and I’m pleased to share one link that talks about how early career professionals can approach job hunting: 12 Tips to Help You Get That Dream Job.  This generation of millennials are doing far more interesting things than I did, and they feel much more inclined to create their own opportunities, either in the way they negotiate their own world @work or create their own working world.

What advice would you give to young twentysomethings about the world @work?

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Once small voices, now have a large impact

I ride the lift with a gorgeous blonde bombshell checking her lipstick in the mirror. Oh, awkward. As we step out on the same floor I realise she’s more than likely Catherine*, the candidate I’m scheduled to interview at 1.00pm. I’m hiring for an NFP CEO role and this is not what I had in mind. Wrong, wrong, wrong.

An hour later I’m eating my words. This fabulously talented, perfectly turned out candidate is just as remarkable in conversation as her career track record and a quick ride up the elevator would indicate.

How many of us are lucky enough to know a truly influential person? Not just someone of notoriety, with a big name or a prominent post. I’m talking about those individuals who are the whole package and do great work on behalf of all of us. People with vision and the passion to achieve it. My 1.00pm candidate is that whole package.

As a marketing and communications recruitment specialist, I’m fortunate to meet professionals who are really making a difference in their field.

What’s also trending is ‘social consciousness’ as a key influencer. Not only do influential people want a job that has a positive impact, they are also intentionally deciding not to work with organisations that have a negative impact on society. Global pressure on environmental concerns has seen investment banks, superannuation funds and universities divesting from fossil fuels. On social issues, international momentum for marriage equality or the humanitarian treatment of refugees are already impacting the Australian conscience. At grass roots we’re thinking critically before we throw money in the fundraising jar or make a charity donation these days: How will those dollars be spent?

Social media has empowered everyone with an internet connection to speak out. It’s elevated the consumer to critic. TV hosts, radio journalists and newspaper columnists are on notice. Companies can live or die by their Twitter feed, politicians are exposed to direct feedback from their electorate and sites like change.org can truly influence.

In this new media environment corporate social responsibility has been elevated to dizzying heights. No longer a nice to have, customers have become increasingly savvy, demanding quality products and services from ethical sources right along the supply chain. Just look at the growing markets for organics in grocery and beauty product lines, renewables in the electricity market and successful start-ups like Tom’s shoes, which literally give something (shoes) back.

Many businesses, as well as the individuals working in them, do want to make a difference. The current international climate is ripe for those who leave a legacy and have a large impact. In the past those with the loudest voices got the world’s attention. Now once small voices are being heard.

Do you know another Catherine* who is having an impact in your world @work?

*not her real name

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When is your time to start horse breeding?

All of us have 24 hours in a day. Not one minute more. Some use it brilliantly, others let it slip away.

Take my accountant, for example. Let’s call him Tony. Known him for years through the football club, done our family work for years. He’s nicely set-up with his own practice in Melbourne’s CBD.

Taking chances is not something commonly associated with accountants, but years ago he took a gamble on a development site and bought property out in the suburbs. It was a land subdivision, and Tony did pretty well. In fact so well that through buying and selling property over a number of projects, he’s since been able to sell his accounting practice. He’s only consulting there two days per week now, and following his true love – horse breeding. Fancy that.

I was having coffee with Tony only recently when he shared something else of his personal success story with me. No, it’s not to get your tax in on time, buy some property or take up an equine business. His considered advice? Use your time wisely, because you don’t ever get it back; focus on quality time, spend time following your passions.

Donald P. Coduto says, “The most important thing, is to keep the most important thing, the most important thing.”

It’s a great reminder for all of us when we’re planning our future: Work hard, take a few risks, but leave time for your most important things. For Tony it’s his horses.

In business we are constantly forecasting and strategising for the future success of our organisations. It took an accountant to remind me that our most rewarding investments in life aren’t those we’ve calculated to make some money for our retirement. I’m planning to get the most out of my 24hrs, spend more quality time with the family, keep the body moving at the gym… and get my tax return in early to Tony.

How do you get the most out of your 24 hours? How have you brought your passion to your world @work?

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